The NLP Index

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1/13/2022 HuSpaCy: an industrial-strength Hungarian natural language processing toolkit
Although there are a couple of open-source language processing pipelines available for Hungarian, none of them satisfies the requirements of today's NLP applications. A language processing pipeline should consist of close to state-of-the-art lemmatization, morphosyntactic analysis, entity recognition and word embeddings. Industrial text processing applications have to satisfy non-functional software quality requirements, what is more, frameworks supporting multiple languages are more and more favored. This paper introduces HuSpaCy, an industryready Hungarian language processing pipeline. The presented tool provides components for the most important basic linguistic analysis tasks. It is open-source and is available under a permissive license. Our system is built upon spaCy's NLP components which means that it is fast, has a rich ecosystem of NLP applications and extensions, comes with extensive documentation and a well-known API. Besides the overview of the underlying models, we also present rigorous evaluation on common benchmark datasets. Our experiments confirm that HuSpaCy has high accuracy in all subtasks while maintaining resource-efficient prediction capabilities.
Gyorgy Orosz, Zsolt Szanto, Peter Berkecz, Gergo Szabo, Richard Farkas
57
Python
1/13/2022 A Hierarchical Model for Spoken Language Recognition
Spoken language recognition (SLR) refers to the automatic process used to determine the language present in a speech sample. SLR is an important task in its own right, for example, as a tool to analyze or categorize large amounts of multi-lingual data. Further, it is also an essential tool for selecting downstream applications in a work flow, for example, to chose appropriate speech recognition or machine translation models. SLR systems are usually composed of two stages, one where an embedding representing the audio sample is extracted and a second one which computes the final scores for each language. In this work, we approach the SLR task as a detection problem and implement the second stage as a probabilistic linear discriminant analysis (PLDA) model. We show that discriminative training of the PLDA parameters gives large gains with respect to the usual generative training. Further, we propose a novel hierarchical approach were two PLDA models are trained, one to generate scores for clusters of highly related languages and a second one to generate scores conditional to each cluster. The final language detection scores are computed as a combination of these two sets of scores. The complete model is trained discriminatively to optimize a cross-entropy objective. We show that this hierarchical approach consistently outperforms the non-hierarchical one for detection of highly related languages, in many cases by large margins. We train our systems on a collection of datasets including 100 languages and test them both on matched and mismatched conditions, showing that the gains are robust to condition mismatch.
Luciana Ferrer, Diego Castan, Mitchell McLaren, Aaron Lawson
21
Python
1/13/2022 BERN2: an advanced neural biomedical named entity recognition and normalization tool
In biomedical natural language processing, named entity recognition (NER) and named entity normalization (NEN) are key tasks that enable the automatic extraction of biomedical entities (e.g., diseases and chemicals) from the ever-growing biomedical literature. In this paper, we present BERN2 (Advanced Biomedical Entity Recognition and Normalization), a tool that improves the previous neural network-based NER tool (Kim et al., 2019) by employing a multi-task NER model and neural network-based NEN models to achieve much faster and more accurate inference. We hope that our tool can help annotate large-scale biomedical texts more accurately for various tasks such as biomedical knowledge graph construction.
Mujeen Sung, Minbyul Jeong, Yonghwa Choi, Donghyeon Kim, Jinhyuk Lee, Jaewoo Kang
20
Python
1/13/2022 Parameter Differentiation based Multilingual Neural Machine Translation
Multilingual neural machine translation (MNMT) aims to translate multiple languages with a single model and has been proved successful thanks to effective knowledge transfer among different languages with shared parameters. However, it is still an open question which parameters should be shared and which ones need to be task-specific. Currently, the common practice is to heuristically design or search language-specific modules, which is difficult to find the optimal configuration. In this paper, we propose a novel parameter differentiation based method that allows the model to determine which parameters should be language-specific during training. Inspired by cellular differentiation, each shared parameter in our method can dynamically differentiate into more specialized types. We further define the differentiation criterion as inter-task gradient similarity. Therefore, parameters with conflicting inter-task gradients are more likely to be language-specific. Extensive experiments on multilingual datasets have demonstrated that our method significantly outperforms various strong baselines with different parameter sharing configurations. Further analyses reveal that the parameter sharing configuration obtained by our method correlates well with the linguistic proximities.
Qian Wang, Jiajun Zhang
15
Python
1/13/2022 Continual Learning with Knowledge Transfer for Sentiment Classification
This paper studies continual learning (CL) for sentiment classification (SC). In this setting, the CL system learns a sequence of SC tasks incrementally in a neural network, where each task builds a classifier to classify the sentiment of reviews of a particular product category or domain. Two natural questions are: Can the system transfer the knowledge learned in the past from the previous tasks to the new task to help it learn a better model for the new task? And, can old models for previous tasks be improved in the process as well? This paper proposes a novel technique called KAN to achieve these objectives. KAN can markedly improve the SC accuracy of both the new task and the old tasks via forward and backward knowledge transfer. The effectiveness of KAN is demonstrated through extensive experiments.
Zixuan Ke, Bing Liu, Hao Wang, Lei Shu
14
Python
1/13/2022 Simple, Interpretable and Stable Method for Detecting Words with Usage Change across Corpora
The problem of comparing two bodies of text and searching for words that differ in their usage between them arises often in digital humanities and computational social science. This is commonly approached by training word embeddings on each corpus, aligning the vector spaces, and looking for words whose cosine distance in the aligned space is large. However, these methods often require extensive filtering of the vocabulary to perform well, and - as we show in this work - result in unstable, and hence less reliable, results. We propose an alternative approach that does not use vector space alignment, and instead considers the neighbors of each word. The method is simple, interpretable and stable. We demonstrate its effectiveness in 9 different setups, considering different corpus splitting criteria (age, gender and profession of tweet authors, time of tweet) and different languages (English, French and Hebrew).
Hila Gonen, Ganesh Jawahar, Djame Seddah, Yoav Goldberg
-
12
Python
1/13/2022 Regularizing End-to-End Speech Translation with Triangular Decomposition Agreement
End-to-end speech-to-text translation~(E2E-ST) is becoming increasingly popular due to the potential of its less error propagation, lower latency, and fewer parameters. Given the triplet training corpus $\langle speech, transcription, translation\rangle$, the conventional high-quality E2E-ST system leverages the $\langle speech, transcription\rangle$ pair to pre-train the model and then utilizes the $\langle speech, translation\rangle$ pair to optimize it further. However, this process only involves two-tuple data at each stage, and this loose coupling fails to fully exploit the association between triplet data. In this paper, we attempt to model the joint probability of transcription and translation based on the speech input to directly leverage such triplet data. Based on that, we propose a novel regularization method for model training to improve the agreement of dual-path decomposition within triplet data, which should be equal in theory. To achieve this goal, we introduce two Kullback-Leibler divergence regularization terms into the model training objective to reduce the mismatch between output probabilities of dual-path. Then the well-trained model can be naturally transformed as the E2E-ST models by the pre-defined early stop tag. Experiments on the MuST-C benchmark demonstrate that our proposed approach significantly outperforms state-of-the-art E2E-ST baselines on all 8 language pairs, while achieving better performance in the automatic speech recognition task. Our code is open-sourced at this https URL.
Yichao Du, Zhirui Zhang, Weizhi Wang, Boxing Chen, Jun Xie, Tong Xu
11
Python
1/13/2022 Europarl-ASR
A 1300-hour English-language speech and text corpus of parliamentary debates for (streaming) ASR training and benchmarking, speech data filtering and speech data verbatimization. Europarl-ASR (EN) includes: [Speech data] 1300 hours of English-language annotated speech data, 3 full sets of timed transcriptions (official non-verbatim, automatically noise-filtered, automatically verbatimized), 18 hours of speech data with both manually revised verbatim transcriptions and official non-verbatim transcriptions, split in 2 independent validation- evaluation partitions for 2 realistic ASR tasks (with vs. without previous knowledge of the speaker); [Text data] 70 million tokens of English-language text data; [Pretrained language models] the Europarl-ASR English-language n-gram language model and vocabulary.
Garces Diaz-Munio et al.
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1/13/2022 Text is no more Enough! A Benchmark for Profile-based Spoken Language Understanding
Current researches on spoken language understanding (SLU) heavily are limited to a simple setting: the plain text-based SLU that takes the user utterance as input and generates its corresponding semantic frames (e.g., intent and slots). Unfortunately, such a simple setting may fail to work in complex real-world scenarios when an utterance is semantically ambiguous, which cannot be achieved by the text-based SLU models. In this paper, we first introduce a new and important task, Profile-based Spoken Language Understanding (ProSLU), which requires the model that not only relies on the plain text but also the supporting profile information to predict the correct intents and slots. To this end, we further introduce a large-scale human-annotated Chinese dataset with over 5K utterances and their corresponding supporting profile information (Knowledge Graph (KG), User Profile (UP), Context Awareness (CA)). In addition, we evaluate several state-of-the-art baseline models and explore a multi-level knowledge adapter to effectively incorporate profile information. Experimental results reveal that all existing text-based SLU models fail to work when the utterances are semantically ambiguous and our proposed framework can effectively fuse the supporting information for sentence-level intent detection and token-level slot filling. Finally, we summarize key challenges and provide new points for future directions, which hopes to facilitate the research.
Xiao Xu, Libo Qin, Kaiji Chen, Guoxing Wu, Linlin Li, Wanxiang Che
11
Python
1/13/2022 Article Reranking by Memory-Enhanced Key Sentence Matching for Detecting Previously Fact-Checked Claims
False claims that have been previously fact-checked can still spread on social media. To mitigate their continual spread, detecting previously fact-checked claims is indispensable. Given a claim, existing works focus on providing evidence for detection by reranking candidate fact-checking articles (FC-articles) retrieved by BM25. However, these performances may be limited because they ignore the following characteristics of FC-articles: (1) claims are often quoted to describe the checked events, providing lexical information besides semantics; (2) sentence templates to introduce or debunk claims are common across articles, providing pattern information. Models that ignore the two aspects only leverage semantic relevance and may be misled by sentences that describe similar but irrelevant events. In this paper, we propose a novel reranker, MTM (Memory-enhanced Transformers for Matching) to rank FC-articles using key sentences selected with event (lexical and semantic) and pattern information. For event information, we propose a ROUGE-guided Transformer which is finetuned with regression of ROUGE. For pattern information, we generate pattern vectors for matching with sentences. By fusing event and pattern information, we select key sentences to represent an article and then predict if the article fact-checks the given claim using the claim, key sentences, and patterns. Experiments on two real-world datasets show that MTM outperforms existing methods. Human evaluation proves that MTM can capture key sentences for explanations. The code and the dataset are at this https URL.
Qiang Sheng, Juan Cao, Xueyao Zhang, Xirong Li, Lei Zhong
9
Jupyter Notebook
1/13/2022 MDFEND: Multi-domain Fake News Detection
Fake news spread widely on social media in various domains, which lead to real-world threats in many aspects like politics, disasters, and finance. Most existing approaches focus on single-domain fake news detection (SFND), which leads to unsatisfying performance when these methods are applied to multi-domain fake news detection. As an emerging field, multi-domain fake news detection (MFND) is increasingly attracting attention. However, data distributions, such as word frequency and propagation patterns, vary from domain to domain, namely domain shift. Facing the challenge of serious domain shift, existing fake news detection techniques perform poorly for multi-domain scenarios. Therefore, it is demanding to design a specialized model for MFND. In this paper, we first design a benchmark of fake news dataset for MFND with domain label annotated, namely Weibo21, which consists of 4,488 fake news and 4,640 real news from 9 different domains. We further propose an effective Multi-domain Fake News Detection Model (MDFEND) by utilizing a domain gate to aggregate multiple representations extracted by a mixture of experts. The experiments show that MDFEND can significantly improve the performance of multi-domain fake news detection. Our dataset and code are available at this https URL.
Qiong Nan, Juan Cao, Yongchun Zhu, Yanyan Wang, Jintao Li
8
Python
1/13/2022 Compact Bidirectional Transformer for Image Captioning
Most current image captioning models typically generate captions from left to right. This unidirectional property makes them can only leverage past context but not future context. Though recent refinement-based models can exploit both past and future context by generating a new caption in the second stage based on pre-retrieved or pre-generated captions in the first stage, the decoder of these models generally consists of two networks~(i.e. a retriever or captioner in the first stage and a refiner in the second stage), which can only be executed sequentially. In this paper, we introduce a Compact Bidirectional Transformer model for image captioning that can leverage bidirectional context implicitly and explicitly while the decoder can be executed parallelly. Specifically, it is implemented by tightly coupling left-to-right(L2R) and right-to-left(R2L) flows into a single compact model~(i.e. implicitly) and optionally allowing interaction of the two flows(i.e. explicitly), while the final caption is chosen from either L2R or R2L flow in a sentence-level ensemble manner. We conduct extensive ablation studies on the MSCOCO benchmark and find that the compact architecture, which serves as a regularization for implicitly exploiting bidirectional context, and the sentence-level ensemble play more important roles than the explicit interaction mechanism. By combining with word-level ensemble seamlessly, the effect of the sentence-level ensemble is further enlarged. We further extend the conventional one-flow self-critical training to the two-flows version under this architecture and achieve new state-of-the-art results in comparison with non-vision-language-pretraining models. Source code is available at {\color{magenta}\url{this https URL}}.
Yuanen Zhou, Zhenzhen Hu, Daqing Liu, Huixia Ben, Meng Wang
7
Python
1/13/2022 Unifying Model Explainability and Robustness for Joint Text Classification and Rationale Extraction
Recent works have shown explainability and robustness are two crucial ingredients of trustworthy and reliable text classification. However, previous works usually address one of two aspects: i) how to extract accurate rationales for explainability while being beneficial to prediction; ii) how to make the predictive model robust to different types of adversarial attacks. Intuitively, a model that produces helpful explanations should be more robust against adversarial attacks, because we cannot trust the model that outputs explanations but changes its prediction under small perturbations. To this end, we propose a joint classification and rationale extraction model named AT-BMC. It includes two key mechanisms: mixed Adversarial Training (AT) is designed to use various perturbations in discrete and embedding space to improve the model's robustness, and Boundary Match Constraint (BMC) helps to locate rationales more precisely with the guidance of boundary information. Performances on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed AT-BMC outperforms baselines on both classification and rationale extraction by a large margin. Robustness analysis shows that the proposed AT-BMC decreases the attack success rate effectively by up to 69%. The empirical results indicate that there are connections between robust models and better explanations.
Dongfang Li, Baotian Hu, Qingcai Chen, Tujie Xu, Jingcong Tao, Yunan Zhang
5
Python
1/13/2022 Hyperparameter-free Continuous Learning for Domain Classification in Natural Language Understanding
Domain classification is the fundamental task in natural language understanding (NLU), which often requires fast accommodation to new emerging domains. This constraint makes it impossible to retrain all previous domains, even if they are accessible to the new model. Most existing continual learning approaches suffer from low accuracy and performance fluctuation, especially when the distributions of old and new data are significantly different. In fact, the key real-world problem is not the absence of old data, but the inefficiency to retrain the model with the whole old dataset. Is it potential to utilize some old data to yield high accuracy and maintain stable performance, while at the same time, without introducing extra hyperparameters? In this paper, we proposed a hyperparameter-free continual learning model for text data that can stably produce high performance under various environments. Specifically, we utilize Fisher information to select exemplars that can "record" key information of the original model. Also, a novel scheme called dynamical weight consolidation is proposed to enable hyperparameter-free learning during the retrain process. Extensive experiments demonstrate that baselines suffer from fluctuated performance and therefore useless in practice. On the contrary, our proposed model CCFI significantly and consistently outperforms the best state-of-the-art method by up to 20% in average accuracy, and each component of CCFI contributes effectively to overall performance.
Ting Hua, Yilin Shen, Changsheng Zhao, Yen-Chang Hsu, Hongxia Jin
4
1/13/2022 CABACE: Injecting Character Sequence Information and Domain Knowledge for Enhanced Acronym and Long-Form Extraction
Acronyms and long-forms are commonly found in research documents, more so in documents from scientific and legal domains. Many acronyms used in such documents are domain-specific and are very rarely found in normal text corpora. Owing to this, transformer-based NLP models often detect OOV (Out of Vocabulary) for acronym tokens, especially for non-English languages, and their performance suffers while linking acronyms to their long forms during extraction. Moreover, pretrained transformer models like BERT are not specialized to handle scientific and legal documents. With these points being the overarching motivation behind this work, we propose a novel framework CABACE: Character-Aware BERT for ACronym Extraction, which takes into account character sequences in text and is adapted to scientific and legal domains by masked language modelling. We further use an objective with an augmented loss function, adding the max loss and mask loss terms to the standard cross-entropy loss for training CABACE. We further leverage pseudo labelling and adversarial data generation to improve the generalizability of the framework. Experimental results prove the superiority of the proposed framework in comparison to various baselines. Additionally, we show that the proposed framework is better suited than baseline models for zero-shot generalization to non-English languages, thus reinforcing the effectiveness of our approach. Our team BacKGProp secured the highest scores on the French dataset, second-highest on Danish and Vietnamese, and third-highest in the English-Legal dataset on the global leaderboard for the acronym extraction (AE) shared task at SDU AAAI-22.
Nithish Kannen, Divyanshu Sheth, Abhranil Chandra, Shubhraneel Pal
4
Jupyter Notebook
1/13/2022 TFW2V: An Enhanced Document Similarity Method for the Morphologically Rich Finnish Language
Measuring the semantic similarity of different texts has many important applications in Digital Humanities research such as information retrieval, document clustering and text summarization. The performance of different methods depends on the length of the text, the domain and the language. This study focuses on experimenting with some of the current approaches to Finnish, which is a morphologically rich language. At the same time, we propose a simple method, TFW2V, which shows high efficiency in handling both long text documents and limited amounts of data. Furthermore, we design an objective evaluation method which can be used as a framework for benchmarking text similarity approaches.
Quan Duong, Mika Hamalainen, Khalid Alnajjar
4
Python
1/13/2022 Does CLIP Benefit Visual Question Answering in the Medical Domain as Much as it Does in the General Domain?
Contrastive Language--Image Pre-training (CLIP) has shown remarkable success in learning with cross-modal supervision from extensive amounts of image--text pairs collected online. Thus far, the effectiveness of CLIP has been investigated primarily in general-domain multimodal problems. This work evaluates the effectiveness of CLIP for the task of Medical Visual Question Answering (MedVQA). To this end, we present PubMedCLIP, a fine-tuned version of CLIP for the medical domain based on PubMed articles. Our experiments are conducted on two MedVQA benchmark datasets and investigate two MedVQA methods, MEVF (Mixture of Enhanced Visual Features) and QCR (Question answering via Conditional Reasoning). For each of these, we assess the merits of visual representation learning using PubMedCLIP, the original CLIP, and state-of-the-art MAML (Model-Agnostic Meta-Learning) networks pre-trained only on visual data. We open source the code for our MedVQA pipeline and pre-training PubMedCLIP. CLIP and PubMedCLIP achieve improvements in comparison to MAML's visual encoder. PubMedCLIP achieves the best results with gains in the overall accuracy of up to 3%. Individual examples illustrate the strengths of PubMedCLIP in comparison to the previously widely used MAML networks. Visual representation learning with language supervision in PubMedCLIP leads to noticeable improvements for MedVQA. Our experiments reveal distributional differences in the two MedVQA benchmark datasets that have not been imparted in previous work and cause different back-end visual encoders in PubMedCLIP to exhibit different behavior on these datasets. Moreover, we witness fundamental performance differences of VQA in general versus medical domains.
Sedigheh Eslami, Gerard de Melo, Christoph Meinel
4
Python
1/13/2022 Training and Generating Neural Networks in Compressed Weight Space
The inputs and/or outputs of some neural nets are weight matrices of other neural nets. Indirect encodings or end-to-end compression of weight matrices could help to scale such approaches. Our goal is to open a discussion on this topic, starting with recurrent neural networks for character-level language modelling whose weight matrices are encoded by the discrete cosine transform. Our fast weight version thereof uses a recurrent neural network to parameterise the compressed weights. We present experimental results on the enwik8 dataset.
Kazuki Irie, Jurgen Schmidhuber
3
Python
1/13/2022 Fine-Tuning Transformers: Vocabulary Transfer
Transformers are responsible for the vast majority of recent advances in natural language processing. The majority of practical natural language processing applications of these models is typically enabled through transfer learning. This paper studies if corpus-specific tokenization used for fine-tuning improves the resulting performance of the model. Through a series of experiments, we demonstrate that such tokenization combined with the initialization and fine-tuning strategy for the vocabulary tokens speeds up the transfer and boosts the performance of the fine-tuned model. We call this aspect of transfer facilitation vocabulary transfer.
Igor Samenko, Alexey Tikhonov, Borislav Kozlovskii, Ivan P. Yamshchikov
3
Python
1/13/2022 Cascading Adaptors to Leverage English Data to Improve Performance of Question Answering for Low-Resource Languages
Transformer based architectures have shown notable results on many down streaming tasks including question answering. The availability of data, on the other hand, impedes obtaining legitimate performance for low-resource languages. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of pre-trained multilingual models to improve the performance of question answering in low-resource languages. We tested four combinations of language and task adapters using multilingual transformer architectures on seven languages similar to MLQA dataset. Additionally, we have also proposed zero-shot transfer learning of low-resource question answering using language and task adapters. We observed that stacking the language and the task adapters improves the multilingual transformer models' performance significantly for low-resource languages.
Hariom A. Pandya, Bhavik Ardeshna, Dr. Brijesh S. Bhatt
3
Python
1/13/2022 ASL-Skeleton3D and ASL-Phono: Two Novel Datasets for the American Sign Language
Sign language is an essential resource enabling access to communication and proper socioemotional development for individuals suffering from disabling hearing loss. As this population is expected to reach 700 million by 2050, the importance of the language becomes even more essential as it plays a critical role to ensure the inclusion of such individuals in society. The Sign Language Recognition field aims to bridge the gap between users and non-users of sign languages. However, the scarcity in quantity and quality of datasets is one of the main challenges limiting the exploration of novel approaches that could lead to significant advancements in this research area. Thus, this paper contributes by introducing two new datasets for the American Sign Language: the first is composed of the three-dimensional representation of the signers and, the second, by an unprecedented linguistics-based representation containing a set of phonological attributes of the signs.
Cleison Correia de Amorim, Cleber Zanchettin
2
Python
1/13/2022 KIND: an Italian Multi-Domain Dataset for Named Entity Recognition
In this paper we present KIND, an Italian dataset for Named-Entity Recognition. It contains more than one million tokens with the annotation covering three classes: persons, locations, and organizations. Most of the dataset (around 600K tokens) contains manual gold annotations in three different domains: news, literature, and political discourses. Texts and annotations are downloadable for free from the Github repository.
Teresa Paccosi, Alessio Palmero Aprosio
2
1/13/2022 Informed Multi-context Entity Alignment
Entity alignment is a crucial step in integrating knowledge graphs (KGs) from multiple sources. Previous attempts at entity alignment have explored different KG structures, such as neighborhood-based and path-based contexts, to learn entity embeddings, but they are limited in capturing the multi-context features. Moreover, most approaches directly utilize the embedding similarity to determine entity alignment without considering the global interaction among entities and relations. In this work, we propose an Informed Multi-context Entity Alignment (IMEA) model to address these issues. In particular, we introduce Transformer to flexibly capture the relation, path, and neighborhood contexts, and design holistic reasoning to estimate alignment probabilities based on both embedding similarity and the relation/entity functionality. The alignment evidence obtained from holistic reasoning is further injected back into the Transformer via the proposed soft label editing to inform embedding learning. Experimental results on several benchmark datasets demonstrate the superiority of our IMEA model compared with existing state-of-the-art entity alignment methods.
Kexuan Xin, Zequn Sun, Wen Hua, Wei Hu, Xiaofang Zhou
2
1/13/2022 Establishing Strong Baselines for TripClick Health Retrieval
We present strong Transformer-based re-ranking and dense retrieval baselines for the recently released TripClick health ad-hoc retrieval collection. We improve the - originally too noisy - training data with a simple negative sampling policy. We achieve large gains over BM25 in the re-ranking task of TripClick, which were not achieved with the original baselines. Furthermore, we study the impact of different domain-specific pre-trained models on TripClick. Finally, we show that dense retrieval outperforms BM25 by considerable margins, even with simple training procedures.
Sebastian Hofstatter, Sophia Althammer, Mete Sertkan, Allan Hanbury
2
1/13/2022 Deconfounded Visual Grounding
We focus on the confounding bias between language and location in the visual grounding pipeline, where we find that the bias is the major visual reasoning bottleneck. For example, the grounding process is usually a trivial language-location association without visual reasoning, e.g., grounding any language query containing sheep to the nearly central regions, due to that most queries about sheep have ground-truth locations at the image center. First, we frame the visual grounding pipeline into a causal graph, which shows the causalities among image, query, target location and underlying confounder. Through the causal graph, we know how to break the grounding bottleneck: deconfounded visual grounding. Second, to tackle the challenge that the confounder is unobserved in general, we propose a confounder-agnostic approach called: Referring Expression Deconfounder (RED), to remove the confounding bias. Third, we implement RED as a simple language attention, which can be applied in any grounding method. On popular benchmarks, RED improves various state-of-the-art grounding methods by a significant margin. Code will soon be available at: this https URL.
Jianqiang Huang, Yu Qin, Jiaxin Qi, Qianru Sun, Hanwang Zhang
1
1/13/2022 Topical Classification of Food Safety Publications with a Knowledge Base
The vast body of scientific publications presents an increasing challenge of finding those that are relevant to a given research question, and making informed decisions on their basis. This becomes extremely difficult without the use of automated tools. Here, one possible area for improvement is automatic classification of publication abstracts according to their topic. This work introduces a novel, knowledge base-oriented publication classifier. The proposed method focuses on achieving scalability and easy adaptability to other domains. Classification speed and accuracy are shown to be satisfactory, in the very demanding field of food safety. Further development and evaluation of the method is needed, as the proposed approach shows much potential.
Piotr Sowinski, Katarzyna Wasielewska-Michniewska, Maria Ganzha, Marcin Paprzycki
1
1/13/2022 ConTrip: Consensus Sentiment review Analysis and Platform ratings in a single score
People unequivocally employ reviews to decide on purchasing an item or an experience on the internet. In that regard, the growing significance and number of opinions have led to the development of methods to assess their sentiment content automatically. However, it is not straightforward for the models to create a consensus value that embodies the agreement of the different reviews and differentiates across equal ratings for an item. Based on the approach proposed by Nguyen et al. in 2020, we derive a novel consensus value named ConTrip that merges their consensus score and the overall rating of a platform for an item. ConTrip lies in the rating range values, which makes it more interpretable while maintaining the ability to differentiate across equally rated experiences. ConTrip is implemented and freely available under MIT license at this https URL
Jose Bonet, Jose Bonet
1
Python
1/13/2022 Multi-Stage Episodic Control for Strategic Exploration in Text Games
Text adventure games present unique challenges to reinforcement learning methods due to their combinatorially large action spaces and sparse rewards. The interplay of these two factors is particularly demanding because large action spaces require extensive exploration, while sparse rewards provide limited feedback. This work proposes to tackle the explore-vs-exploit dilemma using a multi-stage approach that explicitly disentangles these two strategies within each episode. Our algorithm, called eXploit-Then-eXplore (XTX), begins each episode using an exploitation policy that imitates a set of promising trajectories from the past, and then switches over to an exploration policy aimed at discovering novel actions that lead to unseen state spaces. This policy decomposition allows us to combine global decisions about which parts of the game space to return to with curiosity-based local exploration in that space, motivated by how a human may approach these games. Our method significantly outperforms prior approaches by 27% and 11% average normalized score over 12 games from the Jericho benchmark (Hausknecht et al., 2020) in both deterministic and stochastic settings, respectively. On the game of Zork1, in particular, XTX obtains a score of 103, more than a 2x improvement over prior methods, and pushes past several known bottlenecks in the game that have plagued previous state-of-the-art methods.
Jens Tuyls, Shunyu Yao, Sham Kakade, Karthik Narasimhan
1
Python
1/13/2022 A Label Dependence-aware Sequence Generation Model for Multi-level Implicit Discourse Relation Recognition
Implicit discourse relation recognition (IDRR) is a challenging but crucial task in discourse analysis. Most existing methods train multiple models to predict multi-level labels independently, while ignoring the dependence between hierarchically structured labels. In this paper, we consider multi-level IDRR as a conditional label sequence generation task and propose a Label Dependence-aware Sequence Generation Model (LDSGM) for it. Specifically, we first design a label attentive encoder to learn the global representation of an input instance and its level-specific contexts, where the label dependence is integrated to obtain better label embeddings. Then, we employ a label sequence decoder to output the predicted labels in a top-down manner, where the predicted higher-level labels are directly used to guide the label prediction at the current level. We further develop a mutual learning enhanced training method to exploit the label dependence in a bottomup direction, which is captured by an auxiliary decoder introduced during training. Experimental results on the PDTB dataset show that our model achieves the state-of-the-art performance on multi-level IDRR. We will release our code at this https URL.
Changxing Wu, Liuwen Cao, Yubin Ge, Yang Liu, Min Zhang, Jinsong Su
1
1/13/2022 Challenge Dataset of Cognates and False Friend Pairs from Indian Languages
Cognates are present in multiple variants of the same text across different languages (e.g., "hund" in German and "hound" in English language mean "dog"). They pose a challenge to various Natural Language Processing (NLP) applications such as Machine Translation, Cross-lingual Sense Disambiguation, Computational Phylogenetics, and Information Retrieval. A possible solution to address this challenge is to identify cognates across language pairs. In this paper, we describe the creation of two cognate datasets for twelve Indian languages, namely Sanskrit, Hindi, Assamese, Oriya, Kannada, Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, Punjabi, Bengali, Marathi, and Malayalam. We digitize the cognate data from an Indian language cognate dictionary and utilize linked Indian language Wordnets to generate cognate sets. Additionally, we use the Wordnet data to create a False Friends' dataset for eleven language pairs. We also evaluate the efficacy of our dataset using previously available baseline cognate detection approaches. We also perform a manual evaluation with the help of lexicographers and release the curated gold-standard dataset with this paper.
Diptesh Kanojia, Pushpak Bhattacharyya, Malhar Kulkarni, Gholamreza Haffari
1
1/13/2022 A Label Dependence-aware Sequence Generation Model for Multi-level Implicit Discourse Relation Recognition
Implicit discourse relation recognition (IDRR) is a challenging but crucial task in discourse analysis. Most existing methods train multiple models to predict multi-level labels independently, while ignoring the dependence between hierarchically structured labels. In this paper, we consider multi-level IDRR as a conditional label sequence generation task and propose a Label Dependence-aware Sequence Generation Model (LDSGM) for it. Specifically, we first design a label attentive encoder to learn the global representation of an input instance and its level-specific contexts, where the label dependence is integrated to obtain better label embeddings. Then, we employ a label sequence decoder to output the predicted labels in a top-down manner, where the predicted higher-level labels are directly used to guide the label prediction at the current level. We further develop a mutual learning enhanced training method to exploit the label dependence in a bottomup direction, which is captured by an auxiliary decoder introduced during training. Experimental results on the PDTB dataset show that our model achieves the state-of-the-art performance on multi-level IDRR. We will release our code at this https URL.
Changxing Wu, Liuwen Cao, Yubin Ge, Yang Liu, Min Zhang, Jinsong Su
1
1/13/2022 Semi-supervised Stance Detection of Tweets Via Distant Network Supervision
Detecting and labeling stance in social media text is strongly motivated by hate speech detection, poll prediction, engagement forecasting, and concerted propaganda detection. Today's best neural stance detectors need large volumes of training data, which is difficult to curate given the fast-changing landscape of social media text and issues on which users opine. Homophily properties over the social network provide strong signal of coarse-grained user-level stance. But semi-supervised approaches for tweet-level stance detection fail to properly leverage homophily. In light of this, We present SANDS, a new semi-supervised stance detector. SANDS starts from very few labeled tweets. It builds multiple deep feature views of tweets. It also uses a distant supervision signal from the social network to provide a surrogate loss signal to the component learners. We prepare two new tweet datasets comprising over 236,000 politically tinted tweets from two demographics (US and India) posted by over 87,000 users, their follower-followee graph, and over 8,000 tweets annotated by linguists. SANDS achieves a macro-F1 score of 0.55 (0.49) on US (India)-based datasets, outperforming 17 baselines (including variants of SANDS) substantially, particularly for minority stance labels and noisy text. Numerous ablation experiments on SANDS disentangle the dynamics of textual and network-propagated stance signals.
Subhabrata Dutta, Samiya Caur, Soumen Chakrabarti, Tanmoy Chakraborty
0
Python
1/13/2022 Fortunately, Discourse Markers Can Enhance Language Models for Sentiment Analysis
In recent years, pretrained language models have revolutionized the NLP world, while achieving state of the art performance in various downstream tasks. However, in many cases, these models do not perform well when labeled data is scarce and the model is expected to perform in the zero or few shot setting. Recently, several works have shown that continual pretraining or performing a second phase of pretraining (inter-training) which is better aligned with the downstream task, can lead to improved results, especially in the scarce data setting. Here, we propose to leverage sentiment-carrying discourse markers to generate large-scale weakly-labeled data, which in turn can be used to adapt language models for sentiment analysis. Extensive experimental results show the value of our approach on various benchmark datasets, including the finance domain. Code, models and data are available at this https URL.
Liat Ein-Dor, Ilya Shnayderman, Artem Spector, Lena Dankin, Ranit Aharonov, Noam Slonim
0
Python
1/13/2022 An Adversarial Benchmark for Fake News Detection Models
With the proliferation of online misinformation, fake news detection has gained importance in the artificial intelligence community. In this paper, we propose an adversarial benchmark that tests the ability of fake news detectors to reason about real-world facts. We formulate adversarial attacks that target three aspects of "understanding": compositional semantics, lexical relations, and sensitivity to modifiers. We test our benchmark using BERT classifiers fine-tuned on the LIAR arXiv:arch-ive/1705648 and Kaggle Fake-News datasets, and show that both models fail to respond to changes in compositional and lexical meaning. Our results strengthen the need for such models to be used in conjunction with other fact checking methods.
Lorenzo Jaime Yu Flores, Yiding Hao
0
Jupyter Notebook
1/13/2022 Hypers at ComMA@ICON: Modelling Aggressiveness, Gender Bias and Communal Bias Identification
Due to the exponentially increasing reach of social media, it is essential to focus on its negative aspects as it can potentially divide society and incite people into violence. In this paper, we present our system description of work on the shared task ComMA@ICON, where we have to classify how aggressive the sentence is and if the sentence is gender-biased or communal biased. These three could be the primary reasons to cause significant problems in society. As team Hypers we have proposed an approach that utilizes different pretrained models with Attention and mean pooling methods. We were able to get Rank 3 with 0.223 Instance F1 score on Bengali, Rank 2 with 0.322 Instance F1 score on Multi-lingual set, Rank 4 with 0.129 Instance F1 score on Meitei and Rank 5 with 0.336 Instance F1 score on Hindi. The source code and the pretrained models of this work can be found here.
Sean Benhur, Roshan Nayak, Kanchana Sivanraju, Adeep Hande, Subalalitha Chinnaudayar Navaneethakrishnan, Ruba Priyadharshini, Bharathi Raja Chakravarthi
0
Python
1/13/2022 Clustering Vietnamese Conversations From Facebook Page To Build Training Dataset For Chatbot
The biggest challenge of building chatbots is training data. The required data must be realistic and large enough to train chatbots. We create a tool to get actual training data from Facebook messenger of a Facebook page. After text preprocessing steps, the newly obtained dataset generates FVnC and Sample dataset. We use the Retraining of BERT for Vietnamese (PhoBERT) to extract features of our text data. K-Means and DBSCAN clustering algorithms are used for clustering tasks based on output embeddings from PhoBERT$_{base}$. We apply V-measure score and Silhouette score to evaluate the performance of clustering algorithms. We also demonstrate the efficiency of PhoBERT compared to other models in feature extraction on the Sample dataset and wiki dataset. A GridSearch algorithm that combines both clustering evaluations is also proposed to find optimal parameters. Thanks to clustering such a number of conversations, we save a lot of time and effort to build data and storylines for training chatbot.
Trieu Hai Nguyen, Thi-Kim-Ngoan Pham, Thi-Hong-Minh Bui, Thanh-Quynh-Chau Nguyen
0
Python
1/13/2022 How do lexical semantics affect translation? An empirical study
Neural machine translation (NMT) systems aim to map text from one language into another. While there are a wide variety of applications of NMT, one of the most important is translation of natural language. A distinguishing factor of natural language is that words are typically ordered according to the rules of the grammar of a given language. Although many advances have been made in developing NMT systems for translating natural language, little research has been done on understanding how the word ordering of and lexical similarity between the source and target language affect translation performance. Here, we investigate these relationships on a variety of low-resource language pairs from the OpenSubtitles2016 database, where the source language is English, and find that the more similar the target language is to English, the greater the translation performance. In addition, we study the impact of providing NMT models with part of speech of words (POS) in the English sequence and find that, for Transformer-based models, the more dissimilar the target language is from English, the greater the benefit provided by POS.
Vivek Subramanian, Dhanasekar Sundararaman
0
Shell
1/13/2022 Data-driven Model Generalizability in Crosslinguistic Low-resource Morphological Segmentation
Common designs of model evaluation typically focus on monolingual settings, where different models are compared according to their performance on a single data set that is assumed to be representative of all possible data for the task at hand. While this may be reasonable for a large data set, this assumption is difficult to maintain in low-resource scenarios, where artifacts of the data collection can yield data sets that are outliers, potentially making conclusions about model performance coincidental. To address these concerns, we investigate model generalizability in crosslinguistic low-resource scenarios. Using morphological segmentation as the test case, we compare three broad classes of models with different parameterizations, taking data from 11 languages across 6 language families. In each experimental setting, we evaluate all models on a first data set, then examine their performance consistency when introducing new randomly sampled data sets with the same size and when applying the trained models to unseen test sets of varying sizes. The results demonstrate that the extent of model generalization depends on the characteristics of the data set, and does not necessarily rely heavily on the data set size. Among the characteristics that we studied, the ratio of morpheme overlap and that of the average number of morphemes per word between the training and test sets are the two most prominent factors. Our findings suggest that future work should adopt random sampling to construct data sets with different sizes in order to make more responsible claims about model evaluation.
Zoey Liu, Emily Prud'hommeaux
0
R
1/13/2022 Watch Those Words: Video Falsification Detection Using Word-Conditioned Facial Motion
In today's era of digital misinformation, we are increasingly faced with new threats posed by video falsification techniques. Such falsifications range from cheapfakes (e.g., lookalikes or audio dubbing) to deepfakes (e.g., sophisticated AI media synthesis methods), which are becoming perceptually indistinguishable from real videos. To tackle this challenge, we propose a multi-modal semantic forensic approach to discover clues that go beyond detecting discrepancies in visual quality, thereby handling both simpler cheapfakes and visually persuasive deepfakes. In this work, our goal is to verify that the purported person seen in the video is indeed themselves by detecting anomalous correspondences between their facial movements and the words they are saying. We leverage the idea of attribution to learn person-specific biometric patterns that distinguish a given speaker from others. We use interpretable Action Units (AUs) to capture a persons' face and head movement as opposed to deep CNN visual features, and we are the first to use word-conditioned facial motion analysis. Unlike existing person-specific approaches, our method is also effective against attacks that focus on lip manipulation. We further demonstrate our method's effectiveness on a range of fakes not seen in training including those without video manipulation, that were not addressed in prior work.
Shruti Agarwal, Liwen Hu, Evonne Ng, Trevor Darrell, Hao Li, Anna Rohrbach
0
1/13/2022 Polite Emotional Dialogue Acts for Conversational Analysis in Daily Dialog Data
Many socio-linguistic cues are used in the conversational analysis, such as emotion, sentiment, and dialogue acts. One of the fundamental social cues is politeness, which linguistically possesses properties useful in conversational analysis. This short article presents some of the brief findings of polite emotional dialogue acts, where we can correlate the relational bonds between these socio-linguistics cues. We found that the utterances with emotion classes Anger and Disgust are more likely to be impolite while Happiness and Sadness to be polite. Similar phenomenon occurs with dialogue acts, Inform and Commissive contain many polite utterances than Question and Directive. Finally, we will conclude on the future work of these findings.
Chandrakant Bothe
-
0
Python
1/13/2022 Towards Personalized Answer Generation in E-Commerce via Multi-Perspective Preference Modeling
Recently, Product Question Answering (PQA) on E-Commerce platforms has attracted increasing attention as it can act as an intelligent online shopping assistant and improve the customer shopping experience. Its key function, automatic answer generation for product-related questions, has been studied by aiming to generate content-preserving while question-related answers. However, an important characteristic of PQA, i.e., personalization, is neglected by existing methods. It is insufficient to provide the same "completely summarized" answer to all customers, since many customers are more willing to see personalized answers with customized information only for themselves, by taking into consideration their own preferences towards product aspects or information needs. To tackle this challenge, we propose a novel Personalized Answer GEneration method (PAGE) with multi-perspective preference modeling, which explores historical user-generated contents to model user preference for generating personalized answers in PQA. Specifically, we first retrieve question-related user history as external knowledge to model knowledge-level user preference. Then we leverage Gaussian Softmax distribution model to capture latent aspect-level user preference. Finally, we develop a persona-aware pointer network to generate personalized answers in terms of both content and style by utilizing personal user preference and dynamic user vocabulary. Experimental results on real-world E-Commerce QA datasets demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms existing methods by generating informative and customized answers, and show that answer generation in E-Commerce can benefit from personalization.
Yang Deng, Yaliang Li, Wenxuan Zhang, Bolin Ding, Wai Lam
0
1/13/2022 Pedagogical Word Recommendation: A novel task and dataset on personalized vocabulary acquisition for L2 learners
When learning a second language (L2), one of the most important but tedious components that often demoralizes students with its ineffectiveness and inefficiency is vocabulary acquisition, or more simply put, memorizing words. In light of such, a personalized and educational vocabulary recommendation system that traces a learner's vocabulary knowledge state would have an immense learning impact as it could resolve both issues. Therefore, in this paper, we propose and release data for a novel task called Pedagogical Word Recommendation (PWR). The main goal of PWR is to predict whether a given learner knows a given word based on other words the learner has already seen. To elaborate, we collect this data via an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) that is serviced to ~1M L2 learners who study for the standardized English exam, TOEIC. As a feature of this ITS, students can directly indicate words they do not know from the questions they solved to create wordbooks. Finally, we report the evaluation results of a Neural Collaborative Filtering approach along with an exploratory data analysis and discuss the impact and efficacy of this dataset as a baseline for future studies on this task.
Jamin Shin, Juneyoung Park
0
1/13/2022 LeSICiN: A Heterogeneous Graph-based Approach for Automatic Legal Statute Identification from Indian Legal Documents
The task of Legal Statute Identification (LSI) aims to identify the legal statutes that are relevant to a given description of Facts or evidence of a legal case. Existing methods only utilize the textual content of Facts and legal articles to guide such a task. However, the citation network among case documents and legal statutes is a rich source of additional information, which is not considered by existing models. In this work, we take the first step towards utilising both the text and the legal citation network for the LSI task. We curate a large novel dataset for this task, including Facts of cases from several major Indian Courts of Law, and statutes from the Indian Penal Code (IPC). Modeling the statutes and training documents as a heterogeneous graph, our proposed model LeSICiN can learn rich textual and graphical features, and can also tune itself to correlate these features. Thereafter, the model can be used to inductively predict links between test documents (new nodes whose graphical features are not available to the model) and statutes (existing nodes). Extensive experiments on the dataset show that our model comfortably outperforms several state-of-the-art baselines, by exploiting the graphical structure along with textual features. The dataset and our codes are available at this https URL.
Shounak Paul, Pawan Goyal, Saptarshi Ghosh
0
Python
1/13/2022 HOPE: A Task-Oriented and Human-Centric Evaluation Framework Using Professional Post-Editing Towards More Effective MT Evaluation
Traditional automatic evaluation metrics for machine translation have been widely criticized by linguists due to their low accuracy, lack of transparency, focus on language mechanics rather than semantics, and low agreement with human quality evaluation. Human evaluations in the form of MQM-like scorecards have always been carried out in real industry setting by both clients and translation service providers (TSPs). However, traditional human translation quality evaluations are costly to perform and go into great linguistic detail, raise issues as to inter-rater reliability (IRR) and are not designed to measure quality of worse than premium quality translations. In this work, we introduce HOPE, a task-oriented and human-centric evaluation framework for machine translation output based on professional post-editing annotations. It contains only a limited number of commonly occurring error types, and use a scoring model with geometric progression of error penalty points (EPPs) reflecting error severity level to each translation unit. The initial experimental work carried out on English-Russian language pair MT outputs on marketing content type of text from highly technical domain reveals that our evaluation framework is quite effective in reflecting the MT output quality regarding both overall system-level performance and segment-level transparency, and it increases the IRR for error type interpretation. The approach has several key advantages, such as ability to measure and compare less than perfect MT output from different systems, ability to indicate human perception of quality, immediate estimation of the labor effort required to bring MT output to premium quality, low-cost and faster application, as well as higher IRR. Our experimental data is available at \url{this https URL}.
Serge Gladkoff, Lifeng Han
0
1/13/2022 Distilling the Knowledge of Romanian BERTs Using Multiple Teachers
As transfer learning from large-scale pre-trained language models has become prevalent in Natural Language Processing, running these models in computationally constrained environments remains a challenging problem yet to address. Several solutions including knowledge distillation, network quantization or network pruning have been proposed; however, these approaches focus mostly on the English language, thus widening the gap when considering low-resource languages. In this work, we introduce three light and fast versions of distilled BERT models for the Romanian language: Distil-BERT-base-ro, Distil-RoBERT-base and DistilMulti-BERT-base-ro. The first two models resulted from individually distilling the knowledge of the two base versions of Romanian BERTs available in literature, while the last one was obtained by distilling their ensemble. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to create publicly available Romanian distilled BERT models, which were thoroughly evaluated on five tasks: part-of-speech tagging, named entity recognition, sentiment analysis, semantic textual similarity and dialect identification. The experimental results on these benchmarks proved that our three distilled models maintain most performance in terms of accuracy with their teachers, while being twice as fast on a GPU and ~35\% smaller. In addition, we further test the similarity between our students and their teachers prediction by measuring their label and probability loyalty, together with regression loyalty - a new metric introduced in this work.
Andrei-Marius Avram, Darius Catrina, Dumitru-Clementin Cercel, Mihai Dascalu, Traian Rebedea, Vasile Pais, Dan Tufis
0
Jupyter Notebook
1/13/2022 New Methods & Metrics for LFQA tasks
Long-form question answering (LFQA) tasks require retrieving the documents pertinent to a query, using them to form a paragraph-length answer. Despite considerable progress in LFQA modeling, fundamental issues impede its progress: i) train/validation/test dataset overlap, ii) absence of automatic metrics and iii) generated answers not being "grounded" in retrieved documents. This work addresses every one these critical bottlenecks, contributing natural language inference/generation (NLI/NLG) methods and metrics that make significant strides to their alleviation.
Suchismit Mahapatra, Vladimir Blagojevic, Pablo Bertorello, Prasanna Kumar
-
0
1/13/2022 CUGE: A Chinese Language Understanding and Generation Evaluation Benchmark
Realizing general-purpose language intelligence has been a longstanding goal for natural language processing, where standard evaluation benchmarks play a fundamental and guiding role. We argue that for general-purpose language intelligence evaluation, the benchmark itself needs to be comprehensive and systematic. To this end, we propose CUGE, a Chinese Language Understanding and Generation Evaluation benchmark with the following features: (1) Hierarchical benchmark framework, where datasets are principally selected and organized with a language capability-task-dataset hierarchy. (2) Multi-level scoring strategy, where different levels of model performance are provided based on the hierarchical framework. To facilitate CUGE, we provide a public leaderboard that can be customized to support flexible model judging criteria. Evaluation results on representative pre-trained language models indicate ample room for improvement towards general-purpose language intelligence. CUGE is publicly available at this http URL.
Yuan Yao, Qingxiu Dong, Jian Guan, Boxi Cao, Zhengyan Zhang, Chaojun Xiao, Xiaozhi Wang, Fanchao Qi, Junwei Bao, Jinran Nie, Zheni Zeng, Yuxian Gu, Kun Zhou, Xuancheng Huang, Wenhao Li, Shuhuai Ren, Jinliang Lu, Chengqiang Xu, Huadong Wang, Guoyang Zeng, Zile Zhou, Jiajun Zhang, Juanzi Li, Minlie Huang, Rui Yan, Xiaodong He, Xiaojun Wan, Xin Zhao, Xu Sun, Yang Liu, Zhiyuan Liu, Xianpei Han, Erhong Yang, Zhifang Sui, Maosong Sun
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12/22/2021 Extreme Zero-Shot Learning for Extreme Text Classification
The eXtreme Multi-label text Classification (XMC) problem concerns finding most relevant labels for an input text instance from a large label set. However, the XMC setup faces two challenges: (1) it is not generalizable to predict unseen labels in dynamic environments, and (2) it requires a large amount of supervised (instance, label) pairs, which can be difficult to obtain for emerging domains. Recently, the generalized zero-shot XMC (GZ-XMC) setup has been studied and ZestXML is proposed accordingly to handle the unseen labels, which still requires a large number of annotated (instance, label) pairs. In this paper, we consider a more practical scenario called Extreme Zero-Shot XMC (EZ-XMC), in which no supervision is needed and merely raw text of instances and labels are accessible. Few-Shot XMC (FS-XMC), an extension to EZ-XMC with limited supervision is also investigated. To learn the semantic embeddings of instances and labels with raw text, we propose to pre-train Transformer-based encoders with self-supervised contrastive losses. Specifically, we develop a pre-training method MACLR, which thoroughly leverages the raw text with techniques including Multi-scale Adaptive Clustering, Label Regularization, and self-training with pseudo positive pairs. Experimental results on four public EZ-XMC datasets demonstrate that MACLR achieves superior performance compared to all other leading baseline methods, in particular with approximately 5-10% improvement in precision and recall on average. Moreover, we also show that our pre-trained encoder can be further improved on FS-XMC when there are a limited number of ground-truth positive pairs in training. By fine-tuning the encoder on such a few-shot subset, MACLR still outperforms other extreme classifiers significantly.
Yuanhao Xiong, Wei-Cheng Chang, Cho-Jui Hsieh, Hsiang-Fu Yu, Inderjit Dhillon
241
Python
12/22/2021 Shennong: a Python toolbox for audio speech features extraction
We introduce Shennong, a Python toolbox and command-line utility for speech features extraction. It implements a wide range of well-established state of art algorithms including spectro-temporal filters such as Mel-Frequency Cepstral Filterbanks or Predictive Linear Filters, pre-trained neural networks, pitch estimators as well as speaker normalization methods and post-processing algorithms. Shennong is an open source, easy-to-use, reliable and extensible framework. The use of Python makes the integration to others speech modeling and machine learning tools easy. It aims to replace or complement several heterogeneous software, such as Kaldi or Praat. After describing the Shennong software architecture, its core components and implemented algorithms, this paper illustrates its use on three applications: a comparison of speech features performances on a phones discrimination task, an analysis of a Vocal Tract Length Normalization model as a function of the speech duration used for training and a comparison of pitch estimation algorithms under various noise conditions.
Mathieu Bernard, Maxime Poli, Julien Karadayi, Emmanuel Dupoux
101
Python
12/22/2021 Efficient Document-level Event Extraction via Pseudo-Trigger-aware Pruned Complete Graph
There are two main challenges in document-level event extraction: 1) argument entities are scattered in different sentences, and 2) event triggers are often not available. To address these challenges, most previous studies mainly focus on building argument chains in an autoregressive way, which is inefficient in both training and inference. In contrast to the previous studies, we propose a fast and lightweight model named as PTPCG. We design a non-autoregressive decoding algorithm to perform event argument combination extraction on pruned complete graphs, which are constructed under the guidance of the automatically selected pseudo triggers. Compared to the previous systems, our system achieves competitive results with lower resource consumption, taking only 3.6% GPU time (pfs-days) for training and up to 8.5 times faster for inference. Besides, our approach shows superior compatibility for the datasets with (or without) triggers and the pseudo triggers can be the supplements for annotated triggers to make further improvements.
Tong Zhu, Xiaoye Qu, Wenliang Chen, Zhefeng Wang, Baoxing Huai, Nicholas Jing Yuan, Min Zhang
51
Python
12/22/2021 Massive-scale Decoding for Text Generation using Lattices
Neural text generation models like those used for summarization and translation generate high-quality outputs, but often concentrate around a mode when what we really want is a diverse set of options. We present a search algorithm to construct lattices encoding a massive number of generation options. First, we restructure decoding as a best-first search, which explores the space differently than beam search and improves efficiency by avoiding pruning paths. Second, we revisit the idea of hypothesis recombination: we can identify pairs of similar generation candidates during search and merge them as an approximation. On both document summarization and machine translation, we show that our algorithm encodes hundreds to thousands of diverse options that remain grammatical and high-quality into one linear-sized lattice. This algorithm provides a foundation for building downstream generation applications on top of massive-scale diverse outputs.
Jiacheng Xu, Greg Durrett
20
HTML
12/22/2021 WECHSEL: Effective initialization of subword embeddings for cross-lingual transfer of monolingual language models
Recently, large pretrained language models (LMs) have gained popularity. Training these models requires ever more computational resources and most of the existing models are trained on English text only. It is exceedingly expensive to train these models in other languages. To alleviate this problem, we introduce a method -- called WECHSEL -- to transfer English models to new languages. We exchange the tokenizer of the English model with a tokenizer in the target language and initialize token embeddings such that they are close to semantically similar English tokens by utilizing multilingual static word embeddings covering English and the target language. We use WECHSEL to transfer GPT-2 and RoBERTa models to 4 other languages (French, German, Chinese and Swahili). WECHSEL improves over a previously proposed method for cross-lingual parameter transfer and outperforms models of comparable size trained from scratch in the target language with up to 64x less training effort. Our method makes training large language models for new languages more accessible and less damaging to the environment. We make our code and models publicly available.
Benjamin Minixhofer, Fabian Paischer, Navid Rekabsaz
20
Python
12/22/2021 Discovering Explanatory Sentences in Legal Case Decisions Using Pre-trained Language Models
Legal texts routinely use concepts that are difficult to understand. Lawyers elaborate on the meaning of such concepts by, among other things, carefully investigating how have they been used in past. Finding text snippets that mention a particular concept in a useful way is tedious, time-consuming, and, hence, expensive. We assembled a data set of 26,959 sentences, coming from legal case decisions, and labeled them in terms of their usefulness for explaining selected legal concepts. Using the dataset we study the effectiveness of transformer-based models pre-trained on large language corpora to detect which of the sentences are useful. In light of models' predictions, we analyze various linguistic properties of the explanatory sentences as well as their relationship to the legal concept that needs to be explained. We show that the transformer-based models are capable of learning surprisingly sophisticated features and outperform the prior approaches to the task.
Jaromir Savelka, Kevin D. Ashley
10
12/22/2021 Plurality and Quantification in Graph Representation of Meaning
In this thesis we present a semantic representation formalism based on directed graphs and explore its linguistic adequacy and explanatory benefits in the semantics of plurality and quantification. Our graph language covers the essentials of natural language semantics using only monadic second-order variables. We define its model-theoretical interpretation in terms of graph traversal, where the relative scope of variables arises from their order of valuation. We present a unification-based mechanism for constructing semantic graphs at a simple syntax-semantics interface, where syntax as a partition function on discourse referents is implemented with categorial grammars by establishing a partly deterministic relation between semantics and syntactic distribution. This mechanism is automated to facilitate future exploration. The present graph formalism is applied to linguistic issues in distributive predication, cross-categorial conjunction, and scope permutation of quantificational expressions, including the exceptional scoping behaviors of indefinites.
Yu Cao
8
Python
12/22/2021 Looking Outside the Box to Ground Language in 3D Scenes
Existing language grounding models often use object proposal bottlenecks: a pre-trained detector proposes objects in the scene and the model learns to select the answer from these box proposals, without attending to the original image or 3D point cloud. Object detectors are typically trained on a fixed vocabulary of objects and attributes that is often too restrictive for open-domain language grounding, where an utterance may refer to visual entities at various levels of abstraction, such as a chair, the leg of a chair, or the tip of the front leg of a chair. We propose a model for grounding language in 3D scenes that bypasses box proposal bottlenecks with three main innovations: i) Iterative attention across the language stream, the point cloud feature stream and 3D box proposals. ii) Transformer decoders with non-parametric entity queries that decode 3D boxes for object and part referentials. iii) Joint supervision from 3D object annotations and language grounding annotations, by treating object detection as grounding of referential utterances comprised of a list of candidate category labels. These innovations result in significant quantitative gains (up to +9% absolute improvement on the SR3D benchmark) over previous approaches on popular 3D language grounding benchmarks. We ablate each of our innovations to show its contribution to the performance of the model. When applied on language grounding on 2D images with minor changes, it performs on par with the state-of-the-art while converges in half of the GPU time. The code and checkpoints will be made available at this https URL
Ayush Jain, Nikolaos Gkanatsios, Ishita Mediratta, Katerina Fragkiadaki
9
12/22/2021 Lex Rosetta: Transfer of Predictive Models Across Languages, Jurisdictions, and Legal Domains
In this paper, we examine the use of multi-lingual sentence embeddings to transfer predictive models for functional segmentation of adjudicatory decisions across jurisdictions, legal systems (common and civil law), languages, and domains (i.e. contexts). Mechanisms for utilizing linguistic resources outside of their original context have significant potential benefits in AI & Law because differences between legal systems, languages, or traditions often block wider adoption of research outcomes. We analyze the use of Language-Agnostic Sentence Representations in sequence labeling models using Gated Recurrent Units (GRUs) that are transferable across languages. To investigate transfer between different contexts we developed an annotation scheme for functional segmentation of adjudicatory decisions. We found that models generalize beyond the contexts on which they were trained (e.g., a model trained on administrative decisions from the US can be applied to criminal law decisions from Italy). Further, we found that training the models on multiple contexts increases robustness and improves overall performance when evaluating on previously unseen contexts. Finally, we found that pooling the training data from all the contexts enhances the models' in-context performance.
Jaromir Savelka, Hannes Westermann, Karim Benyekhlef, Charlotte S. Alexander, Jayla C. Grant, David Restrepo Amariles, Rajaa El Hamdani, Sebastien Meeus, Michal Araszkiewicz, Kevin D. Ashley, Alexandra Ashley, Karl Branting, Mattia Falduti, Matthias Grabmair, Jakub Harasta, Tereza Novotna, Elizabeth Tippett, Shiwanni Johnson
4
Jupyter Notebook
12/22/2021 Spinning Language Models for Propaganda-As-A-Service
We investigate a new threat to neural sequence-to-sequence (seq2seq) models: training-time attacks that cause models to "spin" their outputs so as to support an adversary-chosen sentiment or point of view, but only when the input contains adversary-chosen trigger words. For example, a spinned summarization model would output positive summaries of any text that mentions the name of some individual or organization. Model spinning enables propaganda-as-a-service. An adversary can create customized language models that produce desired spins for chosen triggers, then deploy them to generate disinformation (a platform attack), or else inject them into ML training pipelines (a supply-chain attack), transferring malicious functionality to downstream models. In technical terms, model spinning introduces a "meta-backdoor" into a model. Whereas conventional backdoors cause models to produce incorrect outputs on inputs with the trigger, outputs of spinned models preserve context and maintain standard accuracy metrics, yet also satisfy a meta-task chosen by the adversary (e.g., positive sentiment). To demonstrate feasibility of model spinning, we develop a new backdooring technique. It stacks the adversarial meta-task onto a seq2seq model, backpropagates the desired meta-task output to points in the word-embedding space we call "pseudo-words," and uses pseudo-words to shift the entire output distribution of the seq2seq model. We evaluate this attack on language generation, summarization, and translation models with different triggers and meta-tasks such as sentiment, toxicity, and entailment. Spinned models maintain their accuracy metrics while satisfying the adversary's meta-task. In supply chain attack the spin transfers to downstream models. Finally, we propose a black-box, meta-task-independent defense to detect models that selectively apply spin to inputs with a certain trigger.
Eugene Bagdasaryan, Vitaly Shmatikov
6
Python
12/22/2021 Exploring Neural Models for Query-Focused Summarization
Query-focused summarization (QFS) aims to produce summaries that answer particular questions of interest, enabling greater user control and personalization. While recently released datasets, such as QMSum or AQuaMuSe, facilitate research efforts in QFS, the field lacks a comprehensive study of the broad space of applicable modeling methods. In this paper we conduct a systematic exploration of neural approaches to QFS, considering two general classes of methods: two-stage extractive-abstractive solutions and end-to-end models. Within those categories, we investigate existing methods and present two model extensions that achieve state-of-the-art performance on the QMSum dataset by a margin of up to 3.38 ROUGE-1, 3.72 ROUGE-2, and 3.28 ROUGE-L. Through quantitative experiments we highlight the trade-offs between different model configurations and explore the transfer abilities between summarization tasks. Code and checkpoints are made publicly available: this https URL.
Jesse Vig, Alexander R. Fabbri, Wojciech Kryscinski, Chien-Sheng Wu, Wenhao Liu
4
Python
12/22/2021 Sparse Structure Learning via Graph Neural Networks for Inductive Document Classification
Recently, graph neural networks (GNNs) have been widely used for document classification. However, most existing methods are based on static word co-occurrence graphs without sentence-level information, which poses three challenges:(1) word ambiguity, (2) word synonymity, and (3) dynamic contextual dependency. To address these challenges, we propose a novel GNN-based sparse structure learning model for inductive document classification. Specifically, a document-level graph is initially generated by a disjoint union of sentence-level word co-occurrence graphs. Our model collects a set of trainable edges connecting disjoint words between sentences and employs structure learning to sparsely select edges with dynamic contextual dependencies. Graphs with sparse structures can jointly exploit local and global contextual information in documents through GNNs. For inductive learning, the refined document graph is further fed into a general readout function for graph-level classification and optimization in an end-to-end manner. Extensive experiments on several real-world datasets demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms most state-of-the-art results, and reveal the necessity to learn sparse structures for each document.
Yinhua Piao, Sangseon Lee, Dohoon Lee, Sun Kim
4
Python
12/22/2021 Analysis and Prediction of NLP Models Via Task Embeddings
Task embeddings are low-dimensional representations that are trained to capture task properties. In this paper, we propose MetaEval, a collection of $101$ NLP tasks. We fit a single transformer to all MetaEval tasks jointly while conditioning it on learned embeddings. The resulting task embeddings enable a novel analysis of the space of tasks. We then show that task aspects can be mapped to task embeddings for new tasks without using any annotated examples. Predicted embeddings can modulate the encoder for zero-shot inference and outperform a zero-shot baseline on GLUE tasks. The provided multitask setup can function as a benchmark for future transfer learning research.
Damien Sileo, Marie-Francine Moens
2
Python
12/22/2021 VALSE: A Task-Independent Benchmark for Vision and Language Models Centered on Linguistic Phenomena
We propose VALSE (Vision And Language Structured Evaluation), a novel benchmark designed for testing general-purpose pretrained vision and language (V&L) models for their visio-linguistic grounding capabilities on specific linguistic phenomena. VALSE offers a suite of six tests covering various linguistic constructs. Solving these requires models to ground linguistic phenomena in the visual modality, allowing more fine-grained evaluations than hitherto possible. We build VALSE using methods that support the construction of valid foils, and report results from evaluating five widely-used V&L models. Our experiments suggest that current models have considerable difficulty addressing most phenomena. Hence, we expect VALSE to serve as an important benchmark to measure future progress of pretrained V&L models from a linguistic perspective, complementing the canonical task-centred V&L evaluations.
Letitia Parcalabescu, Michele Cafagna, Lilitta Muradjan, Anette Frank, Iacer Calixto, Albert Gatt
1
12/22/2021 Evaluating Pretrained Transformer Models for Entity Linking in Task-Oriented Dialog
The wide applicability of pretrained transformer models (PTMs) for natural language tasks is well demonstrated, but their ability to comprehend short phrases of text is less explored. To this end, we evaluate different PTMs from the lens of unsupervised Entity Linking in task-oriented dialog across 5 characteristics -- syntactic, semantic, short-forms, numeric and phonetic. Our results demonstrate that several of the PTMs produce sub-par results when compared to traditional techniques, albeit competitive to other neural baselines. We find that some of their shortcomings can be addressed by using PTMs fine-tuned for text-similarity tasks, which illustrate an improved ability in comprehending semantic and syntactic correspondences, as well as some improvements for short-forms, numeric and phonetic variations in entity mentions. We perform qualitative analysis to understand nuances in their predictions and discuss scope for further improvements. Code can be found at this https URL
Sai Muralidhar Jayanthi, Varsha Embar, Karthik Raghunathan
1
12/22/2021 Automated Evidence Collection for Fake News Detection
Fake news, misinformation, and unverifiable facts on social media platforms propagate disharmony and affect society, especially when dealing with an epidemic like COVID-19. The task of Fake News Detection aims to tackle the effects of such misinformation by classifying news items as fake or real. In this paper, we propose a novel approach that improves over the current automatic fake news detection approaches by automatically gathering evidence for each claim. Our approach extracts supporting evidence from the web articles and then selects appropriate text to be treated as evidence sets. We use a pre-trained summarizer on these evidence sets and then use the extracted summary as supporting evidence to aid the classification task. Our experiments, using both machine learning and deep learning-based methods, help perform an extensive evaluation of our approach. The results show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art methods in fake news detection to achieve an F1-score of 99.25 over the dataset provided for the CONSTRAINT-2021 Shared Task. We also release the augmented dataset, our code and models for any further research.
Mrinal Rawat, Diptesh Kanojia
1
Python
12/22/2021 Multimodal Interactions Using Pretrained Unimodal Models for SIMMC 2.0
This paper presents our work on the Situated Interactive MultiModal Conversations 2.0 challenge held at Dialog State Tracking Challenge 10. SIMMC 2.0 includes 4 subtasks, and we introduce our multimodal approaches for the subtask \#1, \#2 and the generation of subtask \#4. SIMMC 2.0 dataset is a multimodal dataset containing image and text information, which is more challenging than the problem of only text-based conversations because it must be solved by understanding the relationship between image and text. Therefore, since there is a limit to solving only text models such as BERT or GPT2, we propose a multimodal model combining image and text. We first pretrain the multimodal model to understand the relationship between image and text, then finetune our model for each task. We achieve the 3rd best performance in subtask \#1, \#2 and a runner-up in the generation of subtask \#4. The source code is available at this https URL.
Joosung Lee, Kijong Han
2
Python
12/22/2021 ANEA: Automated (Named) Entity Annotation for German Domain-Specific Texts
Named entity recognition (NER) is an important task that aims to resolve universal categories of named entities, e.g., persons, locations, organizations, and times. Despite its common and viable use in many use cases, NER is barely applicable in domains where general categories are suboptimal, such as engineering or medicine. To facilitate NER of domain-specific types, we propose ANEA, an automated (named) entity annotator to assist human annotators in creating domain-specific NER corpora for German text collections when given a set of domain-specific texts. In our evaluation, we find that ANEA automatically identifies terms that best represent the texts' content, identifies groups of coherent terms, and extracts and assigns descriptive labels to these groups, i.e., annotates text datasets into the domain (named) entities.
Anastasia Zhukova, Felix Hamborg, Bela Gipp
0
Python
12/22/2021 TempoQR: Temporal Question Reasoning over Knowledge Graphs
Knowledge Graph Question Answering (KGQA) involves retrieving facts from a Knowledge Graph (KG) using natural language queries. A KG is a curated set of facts consisting of entities linked by relations. Certain facts include also temporal information forming a Temporal KG (TKG). Although many natural questions involve explicit or implicit time constraints, question answering (QA) over TKGs has been a relatively unexplored area. Existing solutions are mainly designed for simple temporal questions that can be answered directly by a single TKG fact. This paper puts forth a comprehensive embedding-based framework for answering complex questions over TKGs. Our method termed temporal question reasoning (TempoQR) exploits TKG embeddings to ground the question to the specific entities and time scope it refers to. It does so by augmenting the question embeddings with context, entity and time-aware information by employing three specialized modules. The first computes a textual representation of a given question, the second combines it with the entity embeddings for entities involved in the question, and the third generates question-specific time embeddings. Finally, a transformer-based encoder learns to fuse the generated temporal information with the question representation, which is used for answer predictions. Extensive experiments show that TempoQR improves accuracy by 25--45 percentage points on complex temporal questions over state-of-the-art approaches and it generalizes better to unseen question types.
Costas Mavromatis, Prasanna Lakkur Subramanyam, Vassilis N. Ioannidis, Soji Adeshina, Phillip R. Howard, Tetiana Grinberg, Nagib Hakim, George Karypis
0
Python
12/22/2021 Harnessing Cross-lingual Features to Improve Cognate Detection for Low-resource Languages
Cognates are variants of the same lexical form across different languages; for example 'fonema' in Spanish and 'phoneme' in English are cognates, both of which mean 'a unit of sound'. The task of automatic detection of cognates among any two languages can help downstream NLP tasks such as Cross-lingual Information Retrieval, Computational Phylogenetics, and Machine Translation. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of cross-lingual word embeddings for detecting cognates among fourteen Indian Languages. Our approach introduces the use of context from a knowledge graph to generate improved feature representations for cognate detection. We, then, evaluate the impact of our cognate detection mechanism on neural machine translation (NMT), as a downstream task. We evaluate our methods to detect cognates on a challenging dataset of twelve Indian languages, namely, Sanskrit, Hindi, Assamese, Oriya, Kannada, Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, Punjabi, Bengali, Marathi, and Malayalam. Additionally, we create evaluation datasets for two more Indian languages, Konkani and Nepali. We observe an improvement of up to 18% points, in terms of F-score, for cognate detection. Furthermore, we observe that cognates extracted using our method help improve NMT quality by up to 2.76 BLEU. We also release our code, newly constructed datasets and cross-lingual models publicly.
Diptesh Kanojia, Raj Dabre, Shubham Dewangan, Pushpak Bhattacharyya, Gholamreza Haffari, Malhar Kulkarni
1
12/22/2021 The King is Naked: on the Notion of Robustness for Natural Language Processing
There is growing evidence that the classical notion of adversarial robustness originally introduced for images has been adopted as a de facto standard by a large part of the NLP research community. We show that this notion is problematic in the context of NLP as it considers a narrow spectrum of linguistic phenomena. In this paper, we argue for semantic robustness, which is better aligned with the human concept of linguistic fidelity. We characterize semantic robustness in terms of biases that it is expected to induce in a model. We study semantic robustness of a range of vanilla and robustly trained architectures using a template-based generative test bed. We complement the analysis with empirical evidence that, despite being harder to implement, semantic robustness can improve performance %gives guarantees for on complex linguistic phenomena where models robust in the classical sense fail.
Emanuele La Malfa, Marta Kwiatkowska
0
Python
12/22/2021 Automated tabulation of clinical trial results: A joint entity and relation extraction approach with transformer-based language representations
Evidence-based medicine, the practice in which healthcare professionals refer to the best available evidence when making decisions, forms the foundation of modern healthcare. However, it relies on labour-intensive systematic reviews, where domain specialists must aggregate and extract information from thousands of publications, primarily of randomised controlled trial (RCT) results, into evidence tables. This paper investigates automating evidence table generation by decomposing the problem across two language processing tasks: \textit{named entity recognition}, which identifies key entities within text, such as drug names, and \textit{relation extraction}, which maps their relationships for separating them into ordered tuples. We focus on the automatic tabulation of sentences from published RCT abstracts that report the results of the study outcomes. Two deep neural net models were developed as part of a joint extraction pipeline, using the principles of transfer learning and transformer-based language representations. To train and test these models, a new gold-standard corpus was developed, comprising almost 600 result sentences from six disease areas. This approach demonstrated significant advantages, with our system performing well across multiple natural language processing tasks and disease areas, as well as in generalising to disease domains unseen during training. Furthermore, we show these results were achievable through training our models on as few as 200 example sentences. The final system is a proof of concept that the generation of evidence tables can be semi-automated, representing a step towards fully automating systematic reviews.
Jetsun Whitton, Anthony Hunter
0
Python
12/22/2021 Unsupervised Editing for Counterfactual Stories
Creating what-if stories requires reasoning about prior statements and possible outcomes of the changed conditions. One can easily generate coherent endings under new conditions, but it would be challenging for current systems to do it with minimal changes to the original story. Therefore, one major challenge is the trade-off between generating a logical story and rewriting with minimal-edits. In this paper, we propose EDUCAT, an editing-based unsupervised approach for counterfactual story rewriting. EDUCAT includes a target position detection strategy based on estimating causal effects of the what-if conditions, which keeps the causal invariant parts of the story. EDUCAT then generates the stories under fluency, coherence and minimal-edits constraints. We also propose a new metric to alleviate the shortcomings of current automatic metrics and better evaluate the trade-off. We evaluate EDUCAT on a public counterfactual story rewriting benchmark. Experiments show that EDUCAT achieves the best trade-off over unsupervised SOTA methods according to both automatic and human evaluation. The resources of EDUCAT are available at: this https URL.
Jiangjie Chen, Chun Gan, Sijie Cheng, Hao Zhou, Yanghua Xiao, Lei Li
2
Python
12/22/2021 Learning and Analyzing Generation Order for Undirected Sequence Models
Undirected neural sequence models have achieved performance competitive with the state-of-the-art directed sequence models that generate monotonically from left to right in machine translation tasks. In this work, we train a policy that learns the generation order for a pre-trained, undirected translation model via reinforcement learning. We show that the translations decoded by our learned orders achieve higher BLEU scores than the outputs decoded from left to right or decoded by the learned order from Mansimov et al. (2019) on the WMT'14 German-English translation task. On examples with a maximum source and target length of 30 from De-En, WMT'16 English-Romanian, and WMT'21 English-Chinese translation tasks, our learned order outperforms all heuristic generation orders on four out of six tasks. We next carefully analyze the learned order patterns via qualitative and quantitative analysis. We show that our policy generally follows an outer-to-inner order, predicting the left-most and right-most positions first, and then moving toward the middle while skipping less important words at the beginning. Furthermore, the policy usually predicts positions for a single syntactic constituent structure in consecutive steps. We believe our findings could provide more insights on the mechanism of undirected generation models and encourage further research in this direction. Our code is publicly available at this https URL
Yichen Jiang, Mohit Bansal
0
Python
12/22/2021 Selecting Parallel In-domain Sentences for Neural Machine Translation Using Monolingual Texts
Continuously-growing data volumes lead to larger generic models. Specific use-cases are usually left out, since generic models tend to perform poorly in domain-specific cases. Our work addresses this gap with a method for selecting in-domain data from generic-domain (parallel text) corpora, for the task of machine translation. The proposed method ranks sentences in parallel general-domain data according to their cosine similarity with a monolingual domain-specific data set. We then select the top K sentences with the highest similarity score to train a new machine translation system tuned to the specific in-domain data. Our experimental results show that models trained on this in-domain data outperform models trained on generic or a mixture of generic and domain data. That is, our method selects high-quality domain-specific training instances at low computational cost and data size.
Javad Pourmostafa Roshan Sharami, Dimitar Shterionov, Pieter Spronck
0
Perl
12/22/2021 Text Classification Models for Form Entity Linking
Forms are a widespread type of template-based document used in a great variety of fields including, among others, administration, medicine, finance, or insurance. The automatic extraction of the information included in these documents is greatly demanded due to the increasing volume of forms that are generated in a daily basis. However, this is not a straightforward task when working with scanned forms because of the great diversity of templates with different location of form entities, and the quality of the scanned documents. In this context, there is a feature that is shared by all forms: they contain a collection of interlinked entities built as key-value (or label-value) pairs, together with other entities such as headers or images. In this work, we have tacked the problem of entity linking in forms by combining image processing techniques and a text classification model based on the BERT architecture. This approach achieves state-of-the-art results with a F1-score of 0.80 on the FUNSD dataset, a 5% improvement regarding the best previous method. The code of this project is available at this https URL.
Maria Villota, Ceasar Dominguez, Jonathan Heras, Eloy Mata, Vico Pascual
0
Jupyter Notebook
12/22/2021 Dependency Learning for Legal Judgment Prediction with a Unified Text-to-Text Transformer
Given the fact of a case, Legal Judgment Prediction (LJP) involves a series of sub-tasks such as predicting violated law articles, charges and term of penalty. We propose leveraging a unified text-to-text Transformer for LJP, where the dependencies among sub-tasks can be naturally established within the auto-regressive decoder. Compared with previous works, it has three advantages: (1) it fits in the pretraining pattern of masked language models, and thereby can benefit from the semantic prompts of each sub-task rather than treating them as atomic labels, (2) it utilizes a single unified architecture, enabling full parameter sharing across all sub-tasks, and (3) it can incorporate both classification and generative sub-tasks. We show that this unified transformer, albeit pretrained on general-domain text, outperforms pretrained models tailored specifically for the legal domain. Through an extensive set of experiments, we find that the best order to capture dependencies is different from human intuitions, and the most reasonable logical order for humans can be sub-optimal for the model. We further include two more auxiliary tasks: court view generation and article content prediction, showing they can not only improve the prediction accuracy, but also provide interpretable explanations for model outputs even when an error is made. With the best configuration, our model outperforms both previous SOTA and a single-tasked version of the unified transformer by a large margin.
Yunyun Huang, Xiaoyu Shen, Chuanyi Li, Jidong Ge, Bin Luo
0
Python
12/22/2021 From Dense to Sparse: Contrastive Pruning for Better Pre-trained Language Model Compression
Pre-trained Language Models (PLMs) have achieved great success in various Natural Language Processing (NLP) tasks under the pre-training and fine-tuning paradigm. With large quantities of parameters, PLMs are computation-intensive and resource-hungry. Hence, model pruning has been introduced to compress large-scale PLMs. However, most prior approaches only consider task-specific knowledge towards downstream tasks, but ignore the essential task-agnostic knowledge during pruning, which may cause catastrophic forgetting problem and lead to poor generalization ability. To maintain both task-agnostic and task-specific knowledge in our pruned model, we propose ContrAstive Pruning (CAP) under the paradigm of pre-training and fine-tuning. It is designed as a general framework, compatible with both structured and unstructured pruning. Unified in contrastive learning, CAP enables the pruned model to learn from the pre-trained model for task-agnostic knowledge, and fine-tuned model for task-specific knowledge. Besides, to better retain the performance of the pruned model, the snapshots (i.e., the intermediate models at each pruning iteration) also serve as effective supervisions for pruning. Our extensive experiments show that adopting CAP consistently yields significant improvements, especially in extremely high sparsity scenarios. With only 3% model parameters reserved (i.e., 97% sparsity), CAP successfully achieves 99.2% and 96.3% of the original BERT performance in QQP and MNLI tasks. In addition, our probing experiments demonstrate that the model pruned by CAP tends to achieve better generalization ability.
Runxin Xu, Fuli Luo, Chengyu Wang, Baobao Chang, Jun Huang, Songfang Huang, Fei Huang
0
12/22/2021 Cognition-aware Cognate Detection
Automatic detection of cognates helps downstream NLP tasks of Machine Translation, Cross-lingual Information Retrieval, Computational Phylogenetics and Cross-lingual Named Entity Recognition. Previous approaches for the task of cognate detection use orthographic, phonetic and semantic similarity based features sets. In this paper, we propose a novel method for enriching the feature sets, with cognitive features extracted from human readers' gaze behaviour. We collect gaze behaviour data for a small sample of cognates and show that extracted cognitive features help the task of cognate detection. However, gaze data collection and annotation is a costly task. We use the collected gaze behaviour data to predict cognitive features for a larger sample and show that predicted cognitive features, also, significantly improve the task performance. We report improvements of 10% with the collected gaze features, and 12% using the predicted gaze features, over the previously proposed approaches. Furthermore, we release the collected gaze behaviour data along with our code and cross-lingual models.
Diptesh Kanojia, Prashant Sharma, Sayali Ghodekar, Pushpak Bhattacharyya, Gholamreza Haffari, Malhar Kulkarni
1
Jupyter Notebook
12/22/2021 Few-Shot Out-of-Domain Transfer Learning of Natural Language Explanations
Recently, there has been an increasing interest in models that generate natural language explanations (NLEs) for their decisions. However, training a model to provide NLEs requires the acquisition of task-specific NLEs, which is time- and resource-consuming. A potential solution is the out-of-domain transfer of NLEs from a domain with a large number of NLEs to a domain with scarce NLEs but potentially a large number of labels, via few-shot transfer learning. In this work, we introduce three vanilla approaches for few-shot transfer learning of NLEs for the case of few NLEs but abundant labels, along with an adaptation of an existing vanilla fine-tuning approach. We transfer explainability from the natural language inference domain, where a large dataset of human-written NLEs exists (e-SNLI), to the domains of (1) hard cases of pronoun resolution, where we introduce a small dataset of NLEs on top of the WinoGrande dataset (small-e-WinoGrande), and (2) commonsense validation (ComVE). Our results demonstrate that the transfer of NLEs outperforms the single-task methods, and establish the best strategies out of the four identified training regimes. We also investigate the scalability of the best methods, both in terms of training data and model size.
Yordan Yordanov, Vid Kocijan, Thomas Lukasiewicz, Oana-Maria Camburu
0
12/15/2021 YourTTS: Towards Zero-Shot Multi-Speaker TTS and Zero-Shot Voice Conversion for everyone
YourTTS brings the power of a multilingual approach to the task of zero-shot multi-speaker TTS. Our method builds upon the VITS model and adds several novel modifications for zero-shot multi-speaker and multilingual training. We achieved state-of-the-art (SOTA) results in zero-shot multi-speaker TTS and results comparable to SOTA in zero-shot voice conversion on the VCTK dataset. Additionally, our approach achieves promising results in a target language with a single-speaker dataset, opening possibilities for zero-shot multi-speaker TTS and zero-shot voice conversion systems in low-resource languages. Finally, it is possible to fine-tune the YourTTS model with less than 1 minute of speech and achieve state-of-the-art results in voice similarity and with reasonable quality. This is important to allow synthesis for speakers with a very different voice or recording characteristics from those seen during training.
Edresson Casanova, Julian Weber, Christopher Shulby, Arnaldo Candido Junior, Eren Golge, Moacir Antonelli Ponti
3511
Python
12/15/2021 JABER: Junior Arabic BERt
Language-specific pre-trained models have proven to be more accurate than multilingual ones in a monolingual evaluation setting, Arabic is no exception. However, we found that previously released Arabic BERT models were significantly under-trained. In this technical report, we present JABER, Junior Arabic BERt, our pretrained language model prototype dedicated for Arabic. We conduct an empirical study to systematically evaluate the performance of models across a diverse set of existing Arabic NLU tasks. Experimental results show that JABER achieves the state-of-the-art performances on ALUE, a new benchmark for Arabic Language Understanding Evaluation, as well as on a well-established NER benchmark
Abbas Ghaddar, Yimeng Wu, Ahmad Rashid, Khalil Bibi, Mehdi Rezagholizadeh, Chao Xing, Yasheng Wang, Duan Xinyu, Zhefeng Wang, Baoxing Huai, Xin Jiang, Qun Liu, Philippe Langlais
2075
Python
12/15/2021 NL-Augmenter: A Framework for Task-Sensitive Natural Language Augmentation
Data augmentation is an important component in the robustness evaluation of models in natural language processing (NLP) and in enhancing the diversity of the data they are trained on. In this paper, we present NL-Augmenter, a new participatory Python-based natural language augmentation framework which supports the creation of both transformations (modifications to the data) and filters (data splits according to specific features). We describe the framework and an initial set of 117 transformations and 23 filters for a variety of natural language tasks. We demonstrate the efficacy of NL-Augmenter by using several of its transformations to analyze the robustness of popular natural language models. The infrastructure, datacards and robustness analysis results are available publicly on the NL-Augmenter repository (\url{this https URL}).
Kaustubh D. Dhole et al.
525
Python
12/15/2021 Grounded Language-Image Pre-training
This paper presents a grounded language-image pre-training (GLIP) model for learning object-level, language-aware, and semantic-rich visual representations. GLIP unifies object detection and phrase grounding for pre-training. The unification brings two benefits: 1) it allows GLIP to learn from both detection and grounding data to improve both tasks and bootstrap a good grounding model; 2) GLIP can leverage massive image-text pairs by generating grounding boxes in a self-training fashion, making the learned representation semantic-rich. In our experiments, we pre-train GLIP on 27M grounding data, including 3M human-annotated and 24M web-crawled image-text pairs. The learned representations demonstrate strong zero-shot and few-shot transferability to various object-level recognition tasks. 1) When directly evaluated on COCO and LVIS (without seeing any images in COCO during pre-training), GLIP achieves 49.8 AP and 26.9 AP, respectively, surpassing many supervised baselines. 2) After fine-tuned on COCO, GLIP achieves 60.8 AP on val and 61.5 AP on test-dev, surpassing prior SoTA. 3) When transferred to 13 downstream object detection tasks, a 1-shot GLIP rivals with a fully-supervised Dynamic Head. Code will be released at this https URL.
Liunian Harold Li, Pengchuan Zhang, Haotian Zhang, Jianwei Yang, Chunyuan Li, Yiwu Zhong, Lijuan Wang, Lu Yuan, Lei Zhang, Jenq-Neng Hwang, Kai-Wei Chang, Jianfeng Gao
229
12/15/2021 Text2Mesh: Text-Driven Neural Stylization for Meshes
In this work, we develop intuitive controls for editing the style of 3D objects. Our framework, Text2Mesh, stylizes a 3D mesh by predicting color and local geometric details which conform to a target text prompt. We consider a disentangled representation of a 3D object using a fixed mesh input (content) coupled with a learned neural network, which we term neural style field network. In order to modify style, we obtain a similarity score between a text prompt (describing style) and a stylized mesh by harnessing the representational power of CLIP. Text2Mesh requires neither a pre-trained generative model nor a specialized 3D mesh dataset. It can handle low-quality meshes (non-manifold, boundaries, etc.) with arbitrary genus, and does not require UV parameterization. We demonstrate the ability of our technique to synthesize a myriad of styles over a wide variety of 3D meshes.
Oscar Michel, Roi Bar-On, Richard Liu, Sagie Benaim, Rana Hanocka
237
Python
12/15/2021 Multinational Address Parsing: A Zero-Shot Evaluation
Address parsing consists of identifying the segments that make up an address, such as a street name or a postal code. Because of its importance for tasks like record linkage, address parsing has been approached with many techniques, the latest relying on neural networks. While these models yield notable results, previous work on neural networks has only focused on parsing addresses from a single source country. This paper explores the possibility of transferring the address parsing knowledge acquired by training deep learning models on some countries' addresses to others with no further training in a zero-shot transfer learning setting. We also experiment using an attention mechanism and a domain adversarial training algorithm in the same zero-shot transfer setting to improve performance. Both methods yield state-of-the-art performance for most of the tested countries while giving good results to the remaining countries. We also explore the effect of incomplete addresses on our best model, and we evaluate the impact of using incomplete addresses during training. In addition, we propose an open-source Python implementation of some of our trained models.
Marouane Yassine, David Beauchemin, Francois Laviolette, Luc Lamontagne
87
Python
12/15/2021 VocBench: A Neural Vocoder Benchmark for Speech Synthesis
Neural vocoders, used for converting the spectral representations of an audio signal to the waveforms, are a commonly used component in speech synthesis pipelines. It focuses on synthesizing waveforms from low-dimensional representation, such as Mel-Spectrograms. In recent years, different approaches have been introduced to develop such vocoders. However, it becomes more challenging to assess these new vocoders and compare their performance to previous ones. To address this problem, we present VocBench, a framework that benchmark the performance of state-of-the art neural vocoders. VocBench uses a systematic study to evaluate different neural vocoders in a shared environment that enables a fair comparison between them. In our experiments, we use the same setup for datasets, training pipeline, and evaluation metrics for all neural vocoders. We perform a subjective and objective evaluation to compare the performance of each vocoder along a different axis. Our results demonstrate that the framework is capable of showing the competitive efficacy and the quality of the synthesized samples for each vocoder. VocBench framework is available at this https URL.
Ehab A. AlBadawy, Andrew Gibiansky, Qing He, Jilong Wu, Ming-Ching Chang, Siwei Lyu
104
Python
12/15/2021 Adapting BERT for Continual Learning of a Sequence of Aspect Sentiment Classification Tasks
This paper studies continual learning (CL) of a sequence of aspect sentiment classification (ASC) tasks. Although some CL techniques have been proposed for document sentiment classification, we are not aware of any CL work on ASC. A CL system that incrementally learns a sequence of ASC tasks should address the following two issues: (1) transfer knowledge learned from previous tasks to the new task to help it learn a better model, and (2) maintain the performance of the models for previous tasks so that they are not forgotten. This paper proposes a novel capsule network based model called B-CL to address these issues. B-CL markedly improves the ASC performance on both the new task and the old tasks via forward and backward knowledge transfer. The effectiveness of B-CL is demonstrated through extensive experiments.
Zixuan Ke, Hu Xu, Bing Liu
62
Python
12/15/2021 CLASSIC: Continual and Contrastive Learning of Aspect Sentiment Classification Tasks
This paper studies continual learning (CL) of a sequence of aspect sentiment classification(ASC) tasks in a particular CL setting called domain incremental learning (DIL). Each task is from a different domain or product. The DIL setting is particularly suited to ASC because in testing the system needs not know the task/domain to which the test data belongs. To our knowledge, this setting has not been studied before for ASC. This paper proposes a novel model called CLASSIC. The key novelty is a contrastive continual learning method that enables both knowledge transfer across tasks and knowledge distillation from old tasks to the new task, which eliminates the need for task ids in testing. Experimental results show the high effectiveness of CLASSIC.
Zixuan Ke, Bing Liu, Hu Xu, Lei Shu
62
Python
12/15/2021 Achieving Forgetting Prevention and Knowledge Transfer in Continual Learning
Continual learning (CL) learns a sequence of tasks incrementally with the goal of achieving two main objectives: overcoming catastrophic forgetting (CF) and encouraging knowledge transfer (KT) across tasks. However, most existing techniques focus only on overcoming CF and have no mechanism to encourage KT, and thus do not do well in KT. Although several papers have tried to deal with both CF and KT, our experiments show that they suffer from serious CF when the tasks do not have much shared knowledge. Another observation is that most current CL methods do not use pre-trained models, but it has been shown that such models can significantly improve the end task performance. For example, in natural language processing, fine-tuning a BERT-like pre-trained language model is one of the most effective approaches. However, for CL, this approach suffers from serious CF. An interesting question is how to make the best use of pre-trained models for CL. This paper proposes a novel model called CTR to solve these problems. Our experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of CTR
Zixuan Ke, Bing Liu, Nianzu Ma, Hu Xu, Lei Shu
62
Python
12/15/2021 CALVIN: A Benchmark for Language-conditioned Policy Learning for Long-horizon Robot Manipulation Tasks
General-purpose robots coexisting with humans in their environment must learn to relate human language to their perceptions and actions to be useful in a range of daily tasks. Moreover, they need to acquire a diverse repertoire of general-purpose skills that allow composing long-horizon tasks by following unconstrained language instructions. In this paper, we present CALVIN (Composing Actions from Language and Vision), an open-source simulated benchmark to learn long-horizon language-conditioned tasks. Our aim is to make it possible to develop agents that can solve many robotic manipulation tasks over a long horizon, from onboard sensors, and specified only via human language. CALVIN tasks are more complex in terms of sequence length, action space, and language than existing vision-and-language task datasets and supports flexible specification of sensor suites. We evaluate the agents in zero-shot to novel language instructions and to novel environments and objects. We show that a baseline model based on multi-context imitation learning performs poorly on CALVIN, suggesting that there is significant room for developing innovative agents that learn to relate human language to their world models with this benchmark.
Oier Mees, Lukas Hermann, Erick Rosete-Beas, Wolfram Burgard
38
Python
12/15/2021 A Bilingual, OpenWorld Video Text Dataset and End-to-end Video Text Spotter with Transformer
Most existing video text spotting benchmarks focus on evaluating a single language and scenario with limited data. In this work, we introduce a large-scale, Bilingual, Open World Video text benchmark dataset(BOVText). There are four features for BOVText. Firstly, we provide 2,000+ videos with more than 1,750,000+ frames, 25 times larger than the existing largest dataset with incidental text in videos. Secondly, our dataset covers 30+ open categories with a wide selection of various scenarios, e.g., Life Vlog, Driving, Movie, etc. Thirdly, abundant text types annotation (i.e., title, caption or scene text) are provided for the different representational meanings in video. Fourthly, the BOVText provides bilingual text annotation to promote multiple cultures live and communication. Besides, we propose an end-to-end video text spotting framework with Transformer, termed TransVTSpotter, which solves the multi-orient text spotting in video with a simple, but efficient attention-based query-key mechanism. It applies object features from the previous frame as a tracking query for the current frame and introduces a rotation angle prediction to fit the multiorient text instance. On ICDAR2015(video), TransVTSpotter achieves the state-of-the-art performance with 44.1% MOTA, 9 fps. The dataset and code of TransVTSpotter can be found at github:com=weijiawu=BOVText and github:com=weijiawu=TransVTSpotter, respectively.
Weijia Wu, Yuanqiang Cai, Debing Zhang, Sibo Wang, Zhuang Li, Jiahong Li, Yejun Tang, Hong Zhou
29
Python
12/15/2021 MLP Architectures for Vision-and-Language Modeling: An Empirical Study
We initiate the first empirical study on the use of MLP architectures for vision-and-language (VL) fusion. Through extensive experiments on 5 VL tasks and 5 robust VQA benchmarks, we find that: (i) Without pre-training, using MLPs for multimodal fusion has a noticeable performance gap compared to transformers; (ii) However, VL pre-training can help close the performance gap; (iii) Instead of heavy multi-head attention, adding tiny one-head attention to MLPs is sufficient to achieve comparable performance to transformers. Moreover, we also find that the performance gap between MLPs and transformers is not widened when being evaluated on the harder robust VQA benchmarks, suggesting using MLPs for VL fusion can generalize roughly to a similar degree as using transformers. These results hint that MLPs can effectively learn to align vision and text features extracted from lower-level encoders without heavy reliance on self-attention. Based on this, we ask an even bolder question: can we have an all-MLP architecture for VL modeling, where both VL fusion and the vision encoder are replaced with MLPs? Our result shows that an all-MLP VL model is sub-optimal compared to state-of-the-art full-featured VL models when both of them get pre-trained. However, pre-training an all-MLP can surprisingly achieve a better average score than full-featured transformer models without pre-training. This indicates the potential of large-scale pre-training of MLP-like architectures for VL modeling and inspires the future research direction on simplifying well-established VL modeling with less inductive design bias. Our code is publicly available at: this https URL
Yixin Nie, Linjie Li, Zhe Gan, Shuohang Wang, Chenguang Zhu, Michael Zeng, Zicheng Liu, Mohit Bansal, Lijuan Wang
23
12/15/2021 VarCLR: Variable Semantic Representation Pre-training via Contrastive Learning
Variable names are critical for conveying intended program behavior. Machine learning-based program analysis methods use variable name representations for a wide range of tasks, such as suggesting new variable names and bug detection. Ideally, such methods could capture semantic relationships between names beyond syntactic similarity, e.g., the fact that the names average and mean are similar. Unfortunately, previous work has found that even the best of previous representation approaches primarily capture relatedness (whether two variables are linked at all), rather than similarity (whether they actually have the same meaning). We propose VarCLR, a new approach for learning semantic representations of variable names that effectively captures variable similarity in this stricter sense. We observe that this problem is an excellent fit for contrastive learning, which aims to minimize the distance between explicitly similar inputs, while maximizing the distance between dissimilar inputs. This requires labeled training data, and thus we construct a novel, weakly-supervised variable renaming dataset mined from GitHub edits. We show that VarCLR enables the effective application of sophisticated, general-purpose language models like BERT, to variable name representation and thus also to related downstream tasks like variable name similarity search or spelling correction. VarCLR produces models that significantly outperform the state-of-the-art on IdBench, an existing benchmark that explicitly captures variable similarity (as distinct from relatedness). Finally, we contribute a release of all data, code, and pre-trained models, aiming to provide a drop-in replacement for variable representations used in either existing or future program analyses that rely on variable names.
Qibin Chen, Jeremy Lacomis, Edward J. Schwartz, Graham Neubig, Bogdan Vasilescu, Claire Le Goues
19
Python
12/15/2021 Zero-shot hashtag segmentation for multilingual sentiment analysis
Hashtag segmentation, also known as hashtag decomposition, is a common step in preprocessing pipelines for social media datasets. It usually precedes tasks such as sentiment analysis and hate speech detection. For sentiment analysis in medium to low-resourced languages, previous research has demonstrated that a multilingual approach that resorts to machine translation can be competitive or superior to previous approaches to the task. We develop a zero-shot hashtag segmentation framework and demonstrate how it can be used to improve the accuracy of multilingual sentiment analysis pipelines. Our zero-shot framework establishes a new state-of-the-art for hashtag segmentation datasets, surpassing even previous approaches that relied on feature engineering and language models trained on in-domain data.
Ruan Chaves Rodrigues, Marcelo Akira Inuzuka, Juliana Resplande Sant'Anna Gomes, Acquila Santos Rocha, Iacer Calixto, Hugo Alexandre Dantas do Nascimento
14
Shell
12/15/2021 HTMOT : Hierarchical Topic Modelling Over Time
Over the years, topic models have provided an efficient way of extracting insights from text. However, while many models have been proposed, none are able to model topic temporality and hierarchy jointly. Modelling time provide more precise topics by separating lexically close but temporally distinct topics while modelling hierarchy provides a more detailed view of the content of a document corpus. In this study, we therefore propose a novel method, HTMOT, to perform Hierarchical Topic Modelling Over Time. We train HTMOT using a new implementation of Gibbs sampling, which is more efficient. Specifically, we show that only applying time modelling to deep sub-topics provides a way to extract specific stories or events while high level topics extract larger themes in the corpus. Our results show that our training procedure is fast and can extract accurate high-level topics and temporally precise sub-topics. We measured our model's performance using the Word Intrusion task and outlined some limitations of this evaluation method, especially for hierarchical models. As a case study, we focused on the various developments in the space industry in 2020.
Judicael Poumay, Ashwin Ittoo
13
HTML
12/15/2021 Quantifying Adaptability in Pre-trained Language Models with 500 Tasks
When a neural language model (LM) is adapted to perform a new task, what aspects of the task predict the eventual performance of the model? In NLP, systematic features of LM generalization to individual examples are well characterized, but systematic aspects of LM adaptability to new tasks are not nearly as well understood. We present a large-scale empirical study of the features and limits of LM adaptability using a new benchmark, TaskBench500, built from 500 procedurally generated sequence modeling tasks. These tasks combine core aspects of language processing, including lexical semantics, sequence processing, memorization, logical reasoning, and world knowledge. Using TaskBench500, we evaluate three facets of adaptability, finding that: (1) adaptation procedures differ dramatically in their ability to memorize small datasets; (2) within a subset of task types, adaptation procedures exhibit compositional adaptability to complex tasks; and (3) failure to match training label distributions is explained by mismatches in the intrinsic difficulty of predicting individual labels. Our experiments show that adaptability to new tasks, like generalization to new examples, can be systematically described and understood, and we conclude with a discussion of additional aspects of adaptability that could be studied using the new benchmark.
Belinda Z. Li, Jane Yu, Madian Khabsa, Luke Zettlemoyer, Alon Halevy, Jacob Andreas
8
Python
12/15/2021 Causal Distillation for Language Models
Distillation efforts have led to language models that are more compact and efficient without serious drops in performance. The standard approach to distillation trains a student model against two objectives: a task-specific objective (e.g., language modeling) and an imitation objective that encourages the hidden states of the student model to be similar to those of the larger teacher model. In this paper, we show that it is beneficial to augment distillation with a third objective that encourages the student to imitate the causal computation process of the teacher through interchange intervention training(IIT). IIT pushes the student model to become a causal abstraction of the teacher model - a simpler model with the same causal structure. IIT is fully differentiable, easily implemented, and combines flexibly with other objectives. Compared with standard distillation of BERT, distillation via IIT results in lower perplexity on Wikipedia (masked language modeling) and marked improvements on the GLUE benchmark (natural language understanding), SQuAD (question answering), and CoNLL-2003 (named entity recognition).
Zhengxuan Wu, Atticus Geiger, Josh Rozner, Elisa Kreiss, Hanson Lu, Thomas Icard, Christopher Potts, Noah D. Goodman
8
Python
12/15/2021 Intelligent Trading Systems: A Sentiment-Aware Reinforcement Learning Approach
The feasibility of making profitable trades on a single asset on stock exchanges based on patterns identification has long attracted researchers. Reinforcement Learning (RL) and Natural Language Processing have gained notoriety in these single-asset trading tasks, but only a few works have explored their combination. Moreover, some issues are still not addressed, such as extracting market sentiment momentum through the explicit capture of sentiment features that reflect the market condition over time and assessing the consistency and stability of RL results in different situations. Filling this gap, we propose the Sentiment-Aware RL (SentARL) intelligent trading system that improves profit stability by leveraging market mood through an adaptive amount of past sentiment features drawn from textual news. We evaluated SentARL across twenty assets, two transaction costs, and five different periods and initializations to show its consistent effectiveness against baselines. Subsequently, this thorough assessment allowed us to identify the boundary between news coverage and market sentiment regarding the correlation of price-time series above which SentARL's effectiveness is outstanding.
Francisco Caio Lima Paiva, Leonardo Kanashiro Felizardo, Reinaldo Augusto da Costa Bianchi, Anna Helena Reali Costa
9
Python
12/15/2021 EmTract: Investor Emotions and Market Behavior
We develop a tool that extracts emotions from social media text data. Our methodology has three main advantages. First, it is tailored for financial context; second, it incorporates key aspects of social media data, such as non-standard phrases, emojis and emoticons; and third, it operates by sequentially learning a latent representation that includes features such as word order, word usage, and local context. This tool, along with a user guide is available at: this https URL. Using EmTract, we explore the relationship between investor emotions expressed on social media and asset prices. We document a number of interesting insights. First, we confirm some of the findings of controlled laboratory experiments relating investor emotions to asset price movements. Second, we show that investor emotions are predictive of daily price movements. These impacts are larger when volatility or short interest are higher, and when institutional ownership or liquidity are lower. Third, increased investor enthusiasm prior to the IPO contributes to the large first-day return and long-run underperformance of IPO stocks. To corroborate our results, we provide a number of robustness checks, including using an alternative emotion model. Our findings reinforce the intuition that emotions and market dynamics are closely related, and highlight the importance of considering investor emotions when assessing a stock's short-term value.
Domonkos Vamossy, Rolf Skog
10
Jupyter Notebook
12/15/2021 BERTMap: A BERT-based Ontology Alignment System
Ontology alignment (a.k.a ontology matching (OM)) plays a critical role in knowledge integration. Owing to the success of machine learning in many domains, it has been applied in OM. However, the existing methods, which often adopt ad-hoc feature engineering or non-contextual word embeddings, have not yet outperformed rule-based systems especially in an unsupervised setting. In this paper, we propose a novel OM system named BERTMap which can support both unsupervised and semi-supervised settings. It first predicts mappings using a classifier based on fine-tuning the contextual embedding model BERT on text semantics corpora extracted from ontologies, and then refines the mappings through extension and repair by utilizing the ontology structure and logic. Our evaluation with three alignment tasks on biomedical ontologies demonstrates that BERTMap can often perform better than the leading OM systems LogMap and AML.
Yuan He, Jiaoyan Chen, Denvar Antonyrajah, Ian Horrocks
6
Python
12/15/2021 Siamese BERT-based Model for Web Search Relevance Ranking Evaluated on a New Czech Dataset
Web search engines focus on serving highly relevant results within hundreds of milliseconds. Pre-trained language transformer models such as BERT are therefore hard to use in this scenario due to their high computational demands. We present our real-time approach to the document ranking problem leveraging a BERT-based siamese architecture. The model is already deployed in a commercial search engine and it improves production performance by more than 3%. For further research and evaluation, we release DaReCzech, a unique data set of 1.6 million Czech user query-document pairs with manually assigned relevance levels. We also release Small-E-Czech, an Electra-small language model pre-trained on a large Czech corpus. We believe this data will support endeavours both of search relevance and multilingual-focused research communities.
Matej Kocian, Jakub Naplava, Daniel Stancl, Vladimir Kadlec
4
Python
12/15/2021 UCD-CS at TREC 2021 Incident Streams Track
In recent years, the task of mining important information from social media posts during crises has become a focus of research for the purposes of assisting emergency response (ES). The TREC Incident Streams (IS) track is a research challenge organised for this purpose. The track asks participating systems to both classify a stream of crisis-related tweets into humanitarian aid related information types and estimate their importance regarding criticality. The former refers to a multi-label information type classification task and the latter refers to a priority estimation task. In this paper, we report on the participation of the University College Dublin School of Computer Science (UCD-CS) in TREC-IS 2021. We explored a variety of approaches, including simple machine learning algorithms, multi-task learning techniques, text augmentation, and ensemble approaches. The official evaluation results indicate that our runs achieve the highest scores in many metrics. To aid reproducibility, our code is publicly available at this https URL.
Congcong Wang, David Lillis
4
Python