The NLP Index

Updated: 08/10/21 - Total repos: 6,824
hits:
time: ms
Added Title Abstract Authors Paper Graph Code
10/14/2021 WenetSpeech: A 10000+ Hours Multi-domain Mandarin Corpus for Speech Recognition
In this paper, we present WenetSpeech, a multi-domain Mandarin corpus consisting of 10000+ hours high-quality labeled speech, 2400+ hours weakly labeled speech, and about 10000 hours unlabeled speech, with 22400+ hours in total. We collect the data from YouTube and Podcast, which covers a variety of speaking styles, scenarios, domains, topics, and noisy conditions. An optical character recognition (OCR) based method is introduced to generate the audio/text segmentation candidates for the YouTube data on its corresponding video captions, while a high-quality ASR transcription system is used to generate audio/text pair candidates for the Podcast data. Then we propose a novel end-to-end label error detection approach to further validate and filter the candidates. We also provide three manually labelled high-quality test sets along with WenetSpeech for evaluation -- Dev for cross-validation purpose in training, Test_Net, collected from Internet for matched test, and Test\_Meeting, recorded from real meetings for more challenging mismatched test. Baseline systems trained with WenetSpeech are provided for three popular speech recognition toolkits, namely Kaldi, ESPnet, and WeNet, and recognition results on the three test sets are also provided as benchmarks. To the best of our knowledge, WenetSpeech is the current largest open-sourced Mandarin speech corpus with transcriptions, which benefits research on production-level speech recognition.
Binbin Zhang, Hang Lv, Pengcheng Guo, Qijie Shao, Chao Yang, Lei Xie, Xin Xu, Hui Bu, Xiaoyu Chen, Chenchen Zeng, Di Wu, Zhendong Peng
90
Shell
10/14/2021 Waypoint Models for Instruction-guided Navigation in Continuous Environments
Little inquiry has explicitly addressed the role of action spaces in language-guided visual navigation -- either in terms of its effect on navigation success or the efficiency with which a robotic agent could execute the resulting trajectory. Building on the recently released VLN-CE setting for instruction following in continuous environments, we develop a class of language-conditioned waypoint prediction networks to examine this question. We vary the expressivity of these models to explore a spectrum between low-level actions and continuous waypoint prediction. We measure task performance and estimated execution time on a profiled LoCoBot robot. We find more expressive models result in simpler, faster to execute trajectories, but lower-level actions can achieve better navigation metrics by approximating shortest paths better. Further, our models outperform prior work in VLN-CE and set a new state-of-the-art on the public leaderboard -- increasing success rate by 4% with our best model on this challenging task.
Jacob Krantz, Aaron Gokaslan, Dhruv Batra, Stefan Lee, Oleksandr Maksymets
83
Python
10/14/2021 Counterfactual Samples Synthesizing and Training for Robust Visual Question Answering
Today's VQA models still tend to capture superficial linguistic correlations in the training set and fail to generalize to the test set with different QA distributions. To reduce these language biases, recent VQA works introduce an auxiliary question-only model to regularize the training of targeted VQA model, and achieve dominating performance on diagnostic benchmarks for out-of-distribution testing. However, due to complex model design, these ensemble-based methods are unable to equip themselves with two indispensable characteristics of an ideal VQA model: 1) Visual-explainable: The model should rely on the right visual regions when making decisions. 2) Question-sensitive: The model should be sensitive to the linguistic variations in questions. To this end, we propose a novel model-agnostic Counterfactual Samples Synthesizing and Training (CSST) strategy. After training with CSST, VQA models are forced to focus on all critical objects and words, which significantly improves both visual-explainable and question-sensitive abilities. Specifically, CSST is composed of two parts: Counterfactual Samples Synthesizing (CSS) and Counterfactual Samples Training (CST). CSS generates counterfactual samples by carefully masking critical objects in images or words in questions and assigning pseudo ground-truth answers. CST not only trains the VQA models with both complementary samples to predict respective ground-truth answers, but also urges the VQA models to further distinguish the original samples and superficially similar counterfactual ones. To facilitate the CST training, we propose two variants of supervised contrastive loss for VQA, and design an effective positive and negative sample selection mechanism based on CSS. Extensive experiments have shown the effectiveness of CSST. Particularly, by building on top of model LMH+SAR, we achieve record-breaking performance on all OOD benchmarks.
Long Chen, Yuhang Zheng, Yulei Niu, Hanwang Zhang, Jun Xiao
57
Python
10/14/2021 Simple Recurrent Neural Networks is all we need for clinical events predictions using EHR data
Recently, there is great interest to investigate the application of deep learning models for the prediction of clinical events using electronic health records (EHR) data. In EHR data, a patient's history is often represented as a sequence of visits, and each visit contains multiple events. As a result, deep learning models developed for sequence modeling, like recurrent neural networks (RNNs) are common architecture for EHR-based clinical events predictive models. While a large variety of RNN models were proposed in the literature, it is unclear if complex architecture innovations will offer superior predictive performance. In order to move this field forward, a rigorous evaluation of various methods is needed. In this study, we conducted a thorough benchmark of RNN architectures in modeling EHR data. We used two prediction tasks: the risk for developing heart failure and the risk of early readmission for inpatient hospitalization. We found that simple gated RNN models, including GRUs and LSTMs, often offer competitive results when properly tuned with Bayesian Optimization, which is in line with similar to findings in the natural language processing (NLP) domain. For reproducibility, Our codebase is shared at this https URL.
Laila Rasmy, Jie Zhu, Zhiheng Li, Xin Hao, Hong Thoai Tran, Yujia Zhou, Firat Tiryaki, Yang Xiang, Hua Xu, Degui Zhi
50
Jupyter Notebook
10/14/2021 Rerunning OCR: A Machine Learning Approach to Quality Assessment and Enhancement Prediction
Iterating with new and improved OCR solutions enforces decisions to be taken when it comes to targeting the right reprocessing candidates. This especially applies when the underlying data collection is of considerable size and rather diverse in terms of fonts, languages, periods of publication and consequently OCR quality. This article captures the efforts of the National Library of Luxembourg to support those exact decisions. They are crucial in order to guarantee low computational overhead and reduced quality degradation risks, combined with a more quantifiable OCR improvement. In particular, this work explains the methodology of the library with respect to text block level quality assessment. As an extension of this technique, another contribution comes in the form of a regression model that takes the enhancement potential of a new OCR engine into account. They both mark promising approaches, especially for cultural institutions dealing with historic data of lower quality.
Pit Schneider
21
Python
10/14/2021 LexGLUE: A Benchmark Dataset for Legal Language Understanding in English
Law, interpretations of law, legal arguments, agreements, etc. are typically expressed in writing, leading to the production of vast corpora of legal text. Their analysis, which is at the center of legal practice, becomes increasingly elaborate as these collections grow in size. Natural language understanding (NLU) technologies can be a valuable tool to support legal practitioners in these endeavors. Their usefulness, however, largely depends on whether current state-of-the-art models can generalize across various tasks in the legal domain. To answer this currently open question, we introduce the Legal General Language Understanding Evaluation (LexGLUE) benchmark, a collection of datasets for evaluating model performance across a diverse set of legal NLU tasks in a standardized way. We also provide an evaluation and analysis of several generic and legal-oriented models demonstrating that the latter consistently offer performance improvements across multiple tasks.
Ilias Chalkidis, Abhik Jana, Dirk Hartung, Michael Bommarito, Ion Androutsopoulos, Daniel Martin Katz, Nikolaos Aletras
21
Python
10/14/2021 End-to-End Supermask Pruning: Learning to Prune Image Captioning Models
With the advancement of deep models, research work on image captioning has led to a remarkable gain in raw performance over the last decade, along with increasing model complexity and computational cost. However, surprisingly works on compression of deep networks for image captioning task has received little to no attention. For the first time in image captioning research, we provide an extensive comparison of various unstructured weight pruning methods on three different popular image captioning architectures, namely Soft-Attention, Up-Down and Object Relation Transformer. Following this, we propose a novel end-to-end weight pruning method that performs gradual sparsification based on weight sensitivity to the training loss. The pruning schemes are then extended with encoder pruning, where we show that conducting both decoder pruning and training simultaneously prior to the encoder pruning provides good overall performance. Empirically, we show that an 80% to 95% sparse network (up to 75% reduction in model size) can either match or outperform its dense counterpart. The code and pre-trained models for Up-Down and Object Relation Transformer that are capable of achieving CIDEr scores >120 on the MS-COCO dataset but with only 8.7 MB and 14.5 MB in model size (size reduction of 96% and 94% respectively against dense versions) are publicly available at this https URL.
Jia Huei Tan, Chee Seng Chan, Joon Huang Chuah
10
Python
10/14/2021 TBCOV: Two Billion Multilingual COVID-19 Tweets with Sentiment, Entity, Geo, and Gender Labels
The widespread usage of social networks during mass convergence events, such as health emergencies and disease outbreaks, provides instant access to citizen-generated data that carry rich information about public opinions, sentiments, urgent needs, and situational reports. Such information can help authorities understand the emergent situation and react accordingly. Moreover, social media plays a vital role in tackling misinformation and disinformation. This work presents TBCOV, a large-scale Twitter dataset comprising more than two billion multilingual tweets related to the COVID-19 pandemic collected worldwide over a continuous period of more than one year. More importantly, several state-of-the-art deep learning models are used to enrich the data with important attributes, including sentiment labels, named-entities (e.g., mentions of persons, organizations, locations), user types, and gender information. Last but not least, a geotagging method is proposed to assign country, state, county, and city information to tweets, enabling a myriad of data analysis tasks to understand real-world issues. Our sentiment and trend analyses reveal interesting insights and confirm TBCOV's broad coverage of important topics.
Muhammad Imran, Umair Qazi, Ferda Ofli
9
Python
10/14/2021 TLDR9+: A Large Scale Resource for Extreme Summarization of Social Media Posts
Recent models in developing summarization systems consist of millions of parameters and the model performance is highly dependent on the abundance of training data. While most existing summarization corpora contain data in the order of thousands to one million, generation of large-scale summarization datasets in order of couple of millions is yet to be explored. Practically, more data is better at generalizing the training patterns to unseen data. In this paper, we introduce TLDR9+ -- a large-scale summarization dataset -- containing over 9 million training instances extracted from Reddit discussion forum (this https URL). This dataset is specifically gathered to perform extreme summarization (i.e., generating one-sentence summary in high compression and abstraction) and is more than twice larger than the previously proposed dataset. We go one step further and with the help of human annotations, we distill a more fine-grained dataset by sampling High-Quality instances from TLDR9+ and call it TLDRHQ dataset. We further pinpoint different state-of-the-art summarization models on our proposed datasets.
Sajad Sotudeh, Hanieh Deilamsalehy, Franck Dernoncourt, Nazli Goharian
8
Python
10/14/2021 Zero-shot Natural Language Video Localization
Understanding videos to localize moments with natural language often requires large expensive annotated video regions paired with language queries. To eliminate the annotation costs, we make a first attempt to train a natural language video localization model in zero-shot manner. Inspired by unsupervised image captioning setup, we merely require random text corpora, unlabeled video collections, and an off-the-shelf object detector to train a model. With the unpaired data, we propose to generate pseudo-supervision of candidate temporal regions and corresponding query sentences, and develop a simple NLVL model to train with the pseudo-supervision. Our empirical validations show that the proposed pseudo-supervised method outperforms several baseline approaches and a number of methods using stronger supervision on Charades-STA and ActivityNet-Captions.
Jinwoo Nam, Daechul Ahn, Dongyeop Kang, Seong Jong Ha, Jonghyun Choi
7
10/14/2021 Weakly-supervised Text Classification Based on Keyword Graph
Weakly-supervised text classification has received much attention in recent years for it can alleviate the heavy burden of annotating massive data. Among them, keyword-driven methods are the mainstream where user-provided keywords are exploited to generate pseudo-labels for unlabeled texts. However, existing methods treat keywords independently, thus ignore the correlation among them, which should be useful if properly exploited. In this paper, we propose a novel framework called ClassKG to explore keyword-keyword correlation on keyword graph by GNN. Our framework is an iterative process. In each iteration, we first construct a keyword graph, so the task of assigning pseudo labels is transformed to annotating keyword subgraphs. To improve the annotation quality, we introduce a self-supervised task to pretrain a subgraph annotator, and then finetune it. With the pseudo labels generated by the subgraph annotator, we then train a text classifier to classify the unlabeled texts. Finally, we re-extract keywords from the classified texts. Extensive experiments on both long-text and short-text datasets show that our method substantially outperforms the existing ones
Lu Zhang, Jiandong Ding, Yi Xu, Yingyao Liu, Shuigeng Zhou
6
Python
10/14/2021 COVID-19 India Dataset: Parsing Detailed COVID-19 Data in Daily Health Bulletins from States in India
While India remains one of the hotspots of the COVID-19 pandemic, data about the pandemic from the country has proved to be largely inaccessible for use at scale. Much of the data exists in an unstructured form on the web, and limited aspects of such data are available through public APIs maintained manually through volunteer efforts. This has proved to be difficult both in terms of ease of access to detailed data as well as with regards to the maintenance of manual data-keeping over time. This paper reports on a recently launched project aimed at automating the extraction of such data from public health bulletins with the help of a combination of classical PDF parsers as well as state-of-the-art ML-based documents extraction APIs. In this paper, we will describe the automated data-extraction technique, the nature of the generated data, and exciting avenues of ongoing work.
Mayank Agarwal, Tathagata Chakraborti, Sachin Grover
5
Python
10/14/2021 PoNet: Pooling Network for Efficient Token Mixing in Long Sequences
Transformer-based models have achieved great success in various NLP, vision, and speech tasks. However, the core of Transformer, the self-attention mechanism, has a quadratic time and memory complexity with respect to the sequence length, which hinders applications of Transformer-based models to long sequences. Many approaches have been proposed to mitigate this problem, such as sparse attention mechanisms, low-rank matrix approximations and scalable kernels, and token mixing alternatives to self-attention. We propose a novel Pooling Network (PoNet) for token mixing in long sequences with linear complexity. We design multi-granularity pooling and pooling fusion to capture different levels of contextual information and combine their interactions with tokens. On the Long Range Arena benchmark, PoNet significantly outperforms Transformer and achieves competitive accuracy, while being only slightly slower than the fastest model, FNet, across all sequence lengths measured on GPUs. We also conduct systematic studies on the transfer learning capability of PoNet and observe that PoNet achieves 96.0% of the accuracy of BERT on the GLUE benchmark, outperforming FNet by 4.5% relative. Comprehensive ablation analysis demonstrates effectiveness of the designed multi-granularity pooling and pooling fusion for token mixing in long sequences and efficacy of the designed pre-training tasks for PoNet to learn transferable contextualized language representations.
Chao-Hong Tan, Qian Chen, Wen Wang, Qinglin Zhang, Siqi Zheng, Zhen-Hua Ling
5
10/14/2021 LEMON: Explainable Entity Matching
State-of-the-art entity matching (EM) methods are hard to interpret, and there is significant value in bringing explainable AI to EM. Unfortunately, most popular explainability methods do not work well out of the box for EM and need adaptation. In this paper, we identify three challenges of applying local post hoc feature attribution methods to entity matching: cross-record interaction effects, non-match explanations, and variation in sensitivity. We propose our novel model-agnostic and schema-flexible method LEMON that addresses all three challenges by (i) producing dual explanations to avoid cross-record interaction effects, (ii) introducing the novel concept of attribution potential to explain how two records could have matched, and (iii) automatically choosing explanation granularity to match the sensitivity of the matcher and record pair in question. Experiments on public datasets demonstrate that the proposed method is more faithful to the matcher and does a better job of helping users understand the decision boundary of the matcher than previous work. Furthermore, user studies show that the rate at which human subjects can construct counterfactual examples after seeing an explanation from our proposed method increases from 54% to 64% for matches and from 15% to 49% for non-matches compared to explanations from a standard adaptation of LIME.
Nils Barlaug
5
Jupyter Notebook
10/14/2021 Towards Continual Knowledge Learning of Language Models
Large Language Models (LMs) are known to encode world knowledge in their parameters as they pretrain on a vast amount of web corpus, which is often utilized for performing knowledge-dependent downstream tasks such as question answering, fact-checking, and open dialogue. In real-world scenarios, the world knowledge stored in the LMs can quickly become outdated as the world changes, but it is non-trivial to avoid catastrophic forgetting and reliably acquire new knowledge while preserving invariant knowledge. To push the community towards better maintenance of ever-changing LMs, we formulate a new continual learning (CL) problem called Continual Knowledge Learning (CKL). We construct a new benchmark and metric to quantify the retention of time-invariant world knowledge, the update of outdated knowledge, and the acquisition of new knowledge. We adopt applicable recent methods from literature to create several strong baselines. Through extensive experiments, we find that CKL exhibits unique challenges that are not addressed in previous CL setups, where parameter expansion is necessary to reliably retain and learn knowledge simultaneously. By highlighting the critical causes of knowledge forgetting, we show that CKL is a challenging and important problem that helps us better understand and train ever-changing LMs.
Joel Jang, Seonghyeon Ye, Sohee Yang, Joongbo Shin, Janghoon Han, Gyeonghun Kim, Stanley Jungkyu Choi, Minjoon Seo
3
10/14/2021 Relation Prediction as an Auxiliary Training Objective for Improving Multi-Relational Graph Representations
Learning good representations on multi-relational graphs is essential to knowledge base completion (KBC). In this paper, we propose a new self-supervised training objective for multi-relational graph representation learning, via simply incorporating relation prediction into the commonly used 1vsAll objective. The new training objective contains not only terms for predicting the subject and object of a given triple, but also a term for predicting the relation type. We analyse how this new objective impacts multi-relational learning in KBC: experiments on a variety of datasets and models show that relation prediction can significantly improve entity ranking, the most widely used evaluation task for KBC, yielding a 6.1% increase in MRR and 9.9% increase in Hits@1 on FB15k-237 as well as a 3.1% increase in MRR and 3.4% in Hits@1 on Aristo-v4. Moreover, we observe that the proposed objective is especially effective on highly multi-relational datasets, i.e. datasets with a large number of predicates, and generates better representations when larger embedding sizes are used.
Yihong Chen, Pasquale Minervini, Sebastian Riedel, Pontus Stenetorp
2
Python
10/14/2021 FoodChem: A food-chemical relation extraction model
In this paper, we present FoodChem, a new Relation Extraction (RE) model for identifying chemicals present in the composition of food entities, based on textual information provided in biomedical peer-reviewed scientific literature. The RE task is treated as a binary classification problem, aimed at identifying whether the contains relation exists between a food-chemical entity pair. This is accomplished by fine-tuning BERT, BioBERT and RoBERTa transformer models. For evaluation purposes, a novel dataset with annotated contains relations in food-chemical entity pairs is generated, in a golden and silver version. The models are integrated into a voting scheme in order to produce the silver version of the dataset which we use for augmenting the individual models, while the manually annotated golden version is used for their evaluation. Out of the three evaluated models, the BioBERT model achieves the best results, with a macro averaged F1 score of 0.902 in the unbalanced augmentation setting.
Gjorgjina Cenikj, Barbara Korousic Seljak, Tome Eftimov
2
Jupyter Notebook
10/14/2021 Exploiting Twitter as Source of Large Corpora of Weakly Similar Pairs for Semantic Sentence Embeddings
Semantic sentence embeddings are usually supervisedly built minimizing distances between pairs of embeddings of sentences labelled as semantically similar by annotators. Since big labelled datasets are rare, in particular for non-English languages, and expensive, recent studies focus on unsupervised approaches that require not-paired input sentences. We instead propose a language-independent approach to build large datasets of pairs of informal texts weakly similar, without manual human effort, exploiting Twitter's intrinsic powerful signals of relatedness: replies and quotes of tweets. We use the collected pairs to train a Transformer model with triplet-like structures, and we test the generated embeddings on Twitter NLP similarity tasks (PIT and TURL) and STSb. We also introduce four new sentence ranking evaluation benchmarks of informal texts, carefully extracted from the initial collections of tweets, proving not only that our best model learns classical Semantic Textual Similarity, but also excels on tasks where pairs of sentences are not exact paraphrases. Ablation studies reveal how increasing the corpus size influences positively the results, even at 2M samples, suggesting that bigger collections of Tweets still do not contain redundant information about semantic similarities.
Marco Di Giovanni, Marco Brambilla
2
Python
10/14/2021 Analyzing the Effects of Reasoning Types on Cross-Lingual Transfer Performance
Multilingual language models achieve impressive zero-shot accuracies in many languages in complex tasks such as Natural Language Inference (NLI). Examples in NLI (and equivalent complex tasks) often pertain to various types of sub-tasks, requiring different kinds of reasoning. Certain types of reasoning have proven to be more difficult to learn in a monolingual context, and in the crosslingual context, similar observations may shed light on zero-shot transfer efficiency and few-shot sample selection. Hence, to investigate the effects of types of reasoning on transfer performance, we propose a category-annotated multilingual NLI dataset and discuss the challenges to scale monolingual annotations to multiple languages. We statistically observe interesting effects that the confluence of reasoning types and language similarities have on transfer performance.
Karthikeyan K, Aalok Sathe, Somak Aditya, Monojit Choudhury
2
10/14/2021 Generalization in NLI: Ways (Not) To Go Beyond Simple Heuristics
Much of recent progress in NLU was shown to be due to models' learning dataset-specific heuristics. We conduct a case study of generalization in NLI (from MNLI to the adversarially constructed HANS dataset) in a range of BERT-based architectures (adapters, Siamese Transformers, HEX debiasing), as well as with subsampling the data and increasing the model size. We report 2 successful and 3 unsuccessful strategies, all providing insights into how Transformer-based models learn to generalize.
Prajjwal Bhargava, Aleksandr Drozd, Anna Rogers
2
Jupyter Notebook
10/14/2021 SPaR.txt, a cheap Shallow Parsing approach for Regulatory texts
Automated Compliance Checking (ACC) systems aim to semantically parse building regulations to a set of rules. However, semantic parsing is known to be hard and requires large amounts of training data. The complexity of creating such training data has led to research that focuses on small sub-tasks, such as shallow parsing or the extraction of a limited subset of rules. This study introduces a shallow parsing task for which training data is relatively cheap to create, with the aim of learning a lexicon for ACC. We annotate a small domain-specific dataset of 200 sentences, SPaR.txt, and train a sequence tagger that achieves 79,93 F1-score on the test set. We then show through manual evaluation that the model identifies most (89,84%) defined terms in a set of building regulation documents, and that both contiguous and discontiguous Multi-Word Expressions (MWE) are discovered with reasonable accuracy (70,3%).
Ruben Kruiper, Ioannis Konstas, Alasdair Gray, Farhad Sadeghineko, Richard Watson, Bimal Kumar
2
Python
10/14/2021 Identifying non-natural language artifacts in bug reports
Bug reports are a popular target for natural language processing (NLP). However, bug reports often contain artifacts such as code snippets, log outputs and stack traces. These artifacts not only inflate the bug reports with noise, but often constitute a real problem for the NLP approach at hand and have to be removed. In this paper, we present a machine learning based approach to classify content into natural language and artifacts at line level implemented in Python. We show how data from GitHub issue trackers can be used for automated training set generation, and present a custom preprocessing approach for bug reports. Our model scores at 0.95 ROC-AUC and 0.93 F1 against our manually annotated validation set, and classifies 10k lines in 0.72 seconds. We cross evaluated our model against a foreign dataset and a foreign R model for the same task. The Python implementation of our model and our datasets are made publicly available under an open source license.
Thomas Hirsch, Birgit Hofer
1
Python
10/14/2021 mRAT-SQL+GAP:A Portuguese Text-to-SQL Transformer
The translation of natural language questions to SQL queries has attracted growing attention, in particular in connection with transformers and similar language models. A large number of techniques are geared towards the English language; in this work, we thus investigated translation to SQL when input questions are given in the Portuguese language. To do so, we properly adapted state-of-the-art tools and resources. We changed the RAT-SQL+GAP system by relying on a multilingual BART model (we report tests with other language models), and we produced a translated version of the Spider dataset. Our experiments expose interesting phenomena that arise when non-English languages are targeted; in particular, it is better to train with original and translated training datasets together, even if a single target language is desired. This multilingual BART model fine-tuned with a double-size training dataset (English and Portuguese) achieved 83% of the baseline, making inferences for the Portuguese test dataset. This investigation can help other researchers to produce results in Machine Learning in a language different from English. Our multilingual ready version of RAT-SQL+GAP and the data are available, open-sourced as mRAT-SQL+GAP at: this https URL
Marcelo Archanjo Jose, Fabio Gagliardi Cozman
1
Python
10/14/2021 Swiss-Judgment-Prediction: A Multilingual Legal Judgment Prediction Benchmark
In many jurisdictions, the excessive workload of courts leads to high delays. Suitable predictive AI models can assist legal professionals in their work, and thus enhance and speed up the process. So far, Legal Judgment Prediction (LJP) datasets have been released in English, French, and Chinese. We publicly release a multilingual (German, French, and Italian), diachronic (2000-2020) corpus of 85K cases from the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland (FSCS). We evaluate state-of-the-art BERT-based methods including two variants of BERT that overcome the BERT input (text) length limitation (up to 512 tokens). Hierarchical BERT has the best performance (approx. 68-70% Macro-F1-Score in German and French). Furthermore, we study how several factors (canton of origin, year of publication, text length, legal area) affect performance. We release both the benchmark dataset and our code to accelerate future research and ensure reproducibility.
Joel Niklaus, Ilias Chalkidis, Matthias Sturmer
1
Python
10/14/2021 The Low-Resource Double Bind: An Empirical Study of Pruning for Low-Resource Machine Translation
A "bigger is better" explosion in the number of parameters in deep neural networks has made it increasingly challenging to make state-of-the-art networks accessible in compute-restricted environments. Compression techniques have taken on renewed importance as a way to bridge the gap. However, evaluation of the trade-offs incurred by popular compression techniques has been centered on high-resource datasets. In this work, we instead consider the impact of compression in a data-limited regime. We introduce the term low-resource double bind to refer to the co-occurrence of data limitations and compute resource constraints. This is a common setting for NLP for low-resource languages, yet the trade-offs in performance are poorly studied. Our work offers surprising insights into the relationship between capacity and generalization in data-limited regimes for the task of machine translation. Our experiments on magnitude pruning for translations from English into Yoruba, Hausa, Igbo and German show that in low-resource regimes, sparsity preserves performance on frequent sentences but has a disparate impact on infrequent ones. However, it improves robustness to out-of-distribution shifts, especially for datasets that are very distinct from the training distribution. Our findings suggest that sparsity can play a beneficial role at curbing memorization of low frequency attributes, and therefore offers a promising solution to the low-resource double bind.
Orevaoghene Ahia, Julia Kreutzer, Sara Hooker
1
Roff
10/14/2021 Pretrained Language Models are Symbolic Mathematics Solvers too!
Solving symbolic mathematics has always been of in the arena of human ingenuity that needs compositional reasoning and recurrence. However, recent studies have shown that large-scale language models such as transformers are universal and surprisingly can be trained as a sequence-to-sequence task to solve complex mathematical equations. These large transformer models need humongous amounts of training data to generalize to unseen symbolic mathematics problems. In this paper, we present a sample efficient way of solving the symbolic tasks by first pretraining the transformer model with language translation and then fine-tuning the pretrained transformer model to solve the downstream task of symbolic mathematics. We achieve comparable accuracy on the integration task with our pretrained model while using around $1.5$ orders of magnitude less number of training samples with respect to the state-of-the-art deep learning for symbolic mathematics. The test accuracy on differential equation tasks is considerably lower comparing with integration as they need higher order recursions that are not present in language translations. We pretrain our model with different pairs of language translations. Our results show language bias in solving symbolic mathematics tasks. Finally, we study the robustness of the fine-tuned model on symbolic math tasks against distribution shift, and our approach generalizes better in distribution shift scenarios for the function integration.
Kimia Noorbakhsh, Modar Sulaiman, Mahdi Sharifi, Kallol Roy, Pooyan Jamshidi
1
Python
10/14/2021 NUS-IDS at FinCausal 2021: Dependency Tree in Graph Neural Network for Better Cause-Effect Span Detection
Automatic identification of cause-effect spans in financial documents is important for causality modelling and understanding reasons that lead to financial events. To exploit the observation that words are more connected to other words with the same cause-effect type in a dependency tree, we construct useful graph embeddings by incorporating dependency relation features through a graph neural network. Our model builds on a baseline BERT token classifier with Viterbi decoding, and outperforms this baseline in cross-validation and during the competition. In the official run of FinCausal 2021, we obtained Precision, Recall, and F1 scores of 95.56%, 95.56% and 95.57% that all ranked 1st place, and an Exact Match score of 86.05% which ranked 3rd place.
Fiona Anting Tan, See-Kiong Ng
1
Python
10/14/2021 TENT: Text Classification Based on ENcoding Tree Learning
Text classification is a primary task in natural language processing (NLP). Recently, graph neural networks (GNNs) have developed rapidly and been applied to text classification tasks. Although more complex models tend to achieve better performance, research highly depends on the computing power of the device used. In this article, we propose TENT (this https URL) to obtain better text classification performance and reduce the reliance on computing power. Specifically, we first establish a dependency analysis graph for each text and then convert each graph into its corresponding encoding tree. The representation of the entire graph is obtained by updating the representation of the non-leaf nodes in the encoding tree. Experimental results show that our method outperforms other baselines on several datasets while having a simple structure and few parameters.
Chong Zhang, Junran Wu, He Zhu, Ke Xu
0
Python
10/14/2021 Federated Distillation of Natural Language Understanding with Confident Sinkhorns
Enhancing the user experience is an essential task for application service providers. For instance, two users living wide apart may have different tastes of food. A food recommender mobile application installed on an edge device might want to learn from user feedback (reviews) to satisfy the client's needs pertaining to distinct domains. Retrieving user data comes at the cost of privacy while asking for model parameters trained on a user device becomes space inefficient at a large scale. In this work, we propose an approach to learn a central (global) model from the federation of (local) models which are trained on user-devices, without disclosing the local data or model parameters to the server. We propose a federation mechanism for the problems with natural similarity metric between the labels which commonly appear in natural language understanding (NLU) tasks. To learn the global model, the objective is to minimize the optimal transport cost of the global model's predictions from the confident sum of soft-targets assigned by local models. The confidence (a model weighting scheme) score of a model is defined as the L2 distance of a model's prediction from its probability bias. The method improves the global model's performance over the baseline designed on three NLU tasks with intrinsic label space semantics, i.e., fine-grained sentiment analysis, emotion recognition in conversation, and natural language inference. We make our codes public at this https URL.
Rishabh Bhardwaj, Tushar Vaidya, Soujanya Poria
0
10/14/2021 ur-iw-hnt at GermEval 2021: An Ensembling Strategy with Multiple BERT Models
This paper describes our approach (ur-iw-hnt) for the Shared Task of GermEval2021 to identify toxic, engaging, and fact-claiming comments. We submitted three runs using an ensembling strategy by majority (hard) voting with multiple different BERT models of three different types: German-based, Twitter-based, and multilingual models. All ensemble models outperform single models, while BERTweet is the winner of all individual models in every subtask. Twitter-based models perform better than GermanBERT models, and multilingual models perform worse but by a small margin.
Hoai Nam Tran, Udo Kruschwitz
0
Jupyter Notebook
10/14/2021 A Logic-Based Framework for Natural Language Inference in Dutch
At its core, the system is powered by two ${\lambda}$-calculi, used as syntactic and semantic theories, respectively. Sentences are first converted to syntactic proofs and terms of the linear ${\lambda}$-calculus using a choice of two parsers: an Alpino-based pipeline, and Neural Proof Nets. The syntactic terms are then converted to semantic terms of the simply typed ${\lambda}$-calculus, via a set of hand designed type- and term-level transformations. Pairs of semantic terms are then fed to an automated theorem prover for natural logic which reasons with them while using lexical relations found in the Open Dutch WordNet. We evaluate the reasoning pipeline on the recently created Dutch natural language inference dataset, and achieve promising results, remaining only within a $1.1-3.2{\%}$ performance margin to strong neural baselines. To the best of our knowledge, the reasoning pipeline is the first logic-based system for Dutch.
Lasha Abzianidze, Konstantinos Kogkalidis
0
Prolog
10/14/2021 HowSumm: A Multi-Document Summarization Dataset Derived from WikiHow Articles
We present \textsc{HowSumm}, a novel large-scale dataset for the task of query-focused multi-document summarization (qMDS), which targets the use-case of generating actionable instructions from a set of sources. This use-case is different from the use-cases covered in existing multi-document summarization (MDS) datasets and is applicable to educational and industrial scenarios. We employed automatic methods, and leveraged statistics from existing human-crafted qMDS datasets, to create \textsc{HowSumm} from wikiHow website articles and the sources they cite. We describe the creation of the dataset and discuss the unique features that distinguish it from other summarization corpora. Automatic and human evaluations of both extractive and abstractive summarization models on the dataset reveal that there is room for improvement. % in existing summarization models We propose that \textsc{HowSumm} can be leveraged to advance summarization research.
Odellia Boni (1), Guy Feigenblat, Guy Lev (1), Michal Shmueli-Scheuer (1), Benjamin Sznajder (1), David Konopnicki ((1) IBM Research - AI)
1
10/14/2021 PSG@HASOC-Dravidian CodeMixFIRE2021: Pretrained Transformers for Offensive Language Identification in Tanglish
This paper describes the system submitted to Dravidian-Codemix-HASOC2021: Hate Speech and Offensive Language Identification in Dravidian Languages (Tamil-English and Malayalam-English). This task aims to identify offensive content in code-mixed comments/posts in Dravidian Languages collected from social media. Our approach utilizes pooling the last layers of pretrained transformer multilingual BERT for this task which helped us achieve rank nine on the leaderboard with a weighted average score of 0.61 for the Tamil-English dataset in subtask B. After the task deadline, we sampled the dataset uniformly and used the MuRIL pretrained model, which helped us achieve a weighted average score of 0.67, the top score in the leaderboard. Furthermore, our approach to utilizing the pretrained models helps reuse our models for the same task with a different dataset. Our code and models are available in this https URL
Sean Benhur, Kanchana Sivanraju
0
Python
10/14/2021 Clustering and Network Analysis for the Embedding Spaces of Sentences and Sub-Sentences
Sentence embedding methods offer a powerful approach for working with short textual constructs or sequences of words. By representing sentences as dense numerical vectors, many natural language processing (NLP) applications have improved their performance. However, relatively little is understood about the latent structure of sentence embeddings. Specifically, research has not addressed whether the length and structure of sentences impact the sentence embedding space and topology. This paper reports research on a set of comprehensive clustering and network analyses targeting sentence and sub-sentence embedding spaces. Results show that one method generates the most clusterable embeddings. In general, the embeddings of span sub-sentences have better clustering properties than the original sentences. The results have implications for future sentence embedding models and applications.
Yuan An, Alexander Kalinowski, Jane Greenberg
0
Jupyter Notebook
10/14/2021 On the Complementarity between Pre-Training and Back-Translation for Neural Machine Translation
Pre-training (PT) and back-translation (BT) are two simple and powerful methods to utilize monolingual data for improving the model performance of neural machine translation (NMT). This paper takes the first step to investigate the complementarity between PT and BT. We introduce two probing tasks for PT and BT respectively and find that PT mainly contributes to the encoder module while BT brings more benefits to the decoder. Experimental results show that PT and BT are nicely complementary to each other, establishing state-of-the-art performances on the WMT16 English-Romanian and English-Russian benchmarks. Through extensive analyses on sentence originality and word frequency, we also demonstrate that combining Tagged BT with PT is more helpful to their complementarity, leading to better translation quality. Source code is freely available at this https URL.
Xuebo Liu, Longyue Wang, Derek F. Wong, Liang Ding, Lidia S. Chao, Shuming Shi, Zhaopeng Tu
0
10/14/2021 Word Acquisition in Neural Language Models
We investigate how neural language models acquire individual words during training, extracting learning curves and ages of acquisition for over 600 words on the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (Fenson et al., 2007). Drawing on studies of word acquisition in children, we evaluate multiple predictors for words' ages of acquisition in LSTMs, BERT, and GPT-2. We find that the effects of concreteness, word length, and lexical class are pointedly different in children and language models, reinforcing the importance of interaction and sensorimotor experience in child language acquisition. Language models rely far more on word frequency than children, but like children, they exhibit slower learning of words in longer utterances. Interestingly, models follow consistent patterns during training for both unidirectional and bidirectional models, and for both LSTM and Transformer architectures. Models predict based on unigram token frequencies early in training, before transitioning loosely to bigram probabilities, eventually converging on more nuanced predictions. These results shed light on the role of distributional learning mechanisms in children, while also providing insights for more human-like language acquisition in language models.
Tyler A. Chang, Benjamin K. Bergen
0
Python
10/14/2021 Investigating Robustness of Dialog Models to Popular Figurative Language Constructs
Humans often employ figurative language use in communication, including during interactions with dialog systems. Thus, it is important for real-world dialog systems to be able to handle popular figurative language constructs like metaphor and simile. In this work, we analyze the performance of existing dialog models in situations where the input dialog context exhibits use of figurative language. We observe large gaps in handling of figurative language when evaluating the models on two open domain dialog datasets. When faced with dialog contexts consisting of figurative language, some models show very large drops in performance compared to contexts without figurative language. We encourage future research in dialog modeling to separately analyze and report results on figurative language in order to better test model capabilities relevant to real-world use. Finally, we propose lightweight solutions to help existing models become more robust to figurative language by simply using an external resource to translate figurative language to literal (non-figurative) forms while preserving the meaning to the best extent possible.
Harsh Jhamtani, Varun Gangal, Eduard Hovy, Taylor Berg-Kirkpatrick
0
10/14/2021 Bridge to Target Domain by Prototypical Contrastive Learning and Label Confusion: Re-explore Zero-Shot Learning for Slot Filling
Zero-shot cross-domain slot filling alleviates the data dependence in the case of data scarcity in the target domain, which has aroused extensive research. However, as most of the existing methods do not achieve effective knowledge transfer to the target domain, they just fit the distribution of the seen slot and show poor performance on unseen slot in the target domain. To solve this, we propose a novel approach based on prototypical contrastive learning with a dynamic label confusion strategy for zero-shot slot filling. The prototypical contrastive learning aims to reconstruct the semantic constraints of labels, and we introduce the label confusion strategy to establish the label dependence between the source domains and the target domain on-the-fly. Experimental results show that our model achieves significant improvement on the unseen slots, while also set new state-of-the-arts on slot filling task.
Liwen Wang, Xuefeng Li, Jiachi Liu, Keqing He, Yuanmeng Yan, Weiran Xu
0
Python
10/14/2021 Parallel Composition of Weighted Finite-State Transducers
Finite-state transducers (FSTs) are frequently used in speech recognition. Transducer composition is an essential operation for combining different sources of information at different granularities. However, composition is also one of the more computationally expensive operations. Due to the heterogeneous structure of FSTs, parallel algorithms for composition are suboptimal in efficiency, generality, or both. We propose an algorithm for parallel composition and implement it on graphics processing units. We benchmark our parallel algorithm on the composition of random graphs and the composition of graphs commonly used in speech recognition. The parallel composition scales better with the size of the input graphs and for large graphs can be as much as 10 to 30 times faster than a sequential CPU algorithm.
Shubho Sengupta, Vineel Pratap, Awni Hannun
n/a
10/6/2021 VideoCLIP: Contrastive Pre-training for Zero-shot Video-Text Understanding
We present VideoCLIP, a contrastive approach to pre-train a unified model for zero-shot video and text understanding, without using any labels on downstream tasks. VideoCLIP trains a transformer for video and text by contrasting temporally overlapping positive video-text pairs with hard negatives from nearest neighbor retrieval. Our experiments on a diverse series of downstream tasks, including sequence-level text-video retrieval, VideoQA, token-level action localization, and action segmentation reveal state-of-the-art performance, surpassing prior work, and in some cases even outperforming supervised approaches. Code is made available at this https URL.
Hu Xu, Gargi Ghosh, Po-Yao Huang, Dmytro Okhonko, Armen Aghajanyan, Florian Metze Luke Zettlemoyer Christoph Feichtenhofer
14119
Python
10/6/2021 Systematic Generalization on gSCAN: What is Nearly Solved and What is Next?
We analyze the grounded SCAN (gSCAN) benchmark, which was recently proposed to study systematic generalization for grounded language understanding. First, we study which aspects of the original benchmark can be solved by commonly used methods in multi-modal research. We find that a general-purpose Transformer-based model with cross-modal attention achieves strong performance on a majority of the gSCAN splits, surprisingly outperforming more specialized approaches from prior work. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that many of the remaining errors reveal the same fundamental challenge in systematic generalization of linguistic constructs regardless of visual context. Second, inspired by this finding, we propose challenging new tasks for gSCAN by generating data to incorporate relations between objects in the visual environment. Finally, we find that current models are surprisingly data inefficient given the narrow scope of commands in gSCAN, suggesting another challenge for future work.
Linlu Qiu, Hexiang Hu, Bowen Zhang, Peter Shaw, Fei Sha
1064
Python
10/6/2021 Investigating Non-local Features for Neural Constituency Parsing
Thanks to the strong representation power of neural encoders, neural chart-based parsers have achieved highly competitive performance by using local features. Recently, it has been shown that non-local features in CRF structures lead to improvements. In this paper, we investigate injecting non-local features into the training process of a local span-based parser, by predicting constituent n-gram non-local patterns and ensuring consistency between non-local patterns and local constituents. Results show that our simple method gives better results than the CRF parser on both PTB and CTB. Besides, our method achieves state-of-the-art BERT-based performance on PTB (95.92 F1) and strong performance on CTB (92.31 F1).
Leyang Cui, Sen Yang, Yue Zhang
632
Python
10/6/2021 OpenViDial 2.0: A Larger-Scale, Open-Domain Dialogue Generation Dataset with Visual Contexts
In order to better simulate the real human conversation process, models need to generate dialogue utterances based on not only preceding textual contexts but also visual contexts. However, with the development of multi-modal dialogue learning, the dataset scale gradually becomes a bottleneck. In this report, we release OpenViDial 2.0, a larger-scale open-domain multi-modal dialogue dataset compared to the previous version OpenViDial 1.0. OpenViDial 2.0 contains a total number of 5.6 million dialogue turns extracted from either movies or TV series from different resources, and each dialogue turn is paired with its corresponding visual context. We hope this large-scale dataset can help facilitate future researches on open-domain multi-modal dialog generation, e.g., multi-modal pretraining for dialogue generation.
Shuhe Wang, Yuxian Meng, Xiaoya Li, Xiaofei Sun, Rongbin Ouyang, Jiwei Li
83
Python
10/6/2021 DziriBERT: a Pre-trained Language Model for the Algerian Dialect
Pre-trained transformers are now the de facto models in Natural Language Processing given their state-of-the-art results in many tasks and languages. However, most of the current models have been trained on languages for which large text resources are already available (such as English, French, Arabic, etc.). Therefore, there is still a number of low-resource languages that need more attention from the community. In this paper, we study the Algerian dialect which has several specificities that make the use of Arabic or multilingual models inappropriate. To address this issue, we collected more than one Million Algerian tweets, and pre-trained the first Algerian language model: DziriBERT. When compared to existing models, DziriBERT achieves the best results on two Algerian downstream datasets. The obtained results show that pre-training a dedicated model on a small dataset (150 MB) can outperform existing models that have been trained on much more data (hundreds of GB). Finally, our model is publicly available to the community.
Amine Abdaoui, Mohamed Berrimi, Mourad Oussalah, Abdelouahab Moussaoui
85
Python
10/6/2021 CLIPort: What and Where Pathways for Robotic Manipulation
How can we imbue robots with the ability to manipulate objects precisely but also to reason about them in terms of abstract concepts? Recent works in manipulation have shown that end-to-end networks can learn dexterous skills that require precise spatial reasoning, but these methods often fail to generalize to new goals or quickly learn transferable concepts across tasks. In parallel, there has been great progress in learning generalizable semantic representations for vision and language by training on large-scale internet data, however these representations lack the spatial understanding necessary for fine-grained manipulation. To this end, we propose a framework that combines the best of both worlds: a two-stream architecture with semantic and spatial pathways for vision-based manipulation. Specifically, we present CLIPort, a language-conditioned imitation-learning agent that combines the broad semantic understanding (what) of CLIP [1] with the spatial precision (where) of Transporter [2]. Our end-to-end framework is capable of solving a variety of language-specified tabletop tasks from packing unseen objects to folding cloths, all without any explicit representations of object poses, instance segmentations, memory, symbolic states, or syntactic structures. Experiments in simulated and real-world settings show that our approach is data efficient in few-shot settings and generalizes effectively to seen and unseen semantic concepts. We even learn one multi-task policy for 10 simulated and 9 real-world tasks that is better or comparable to single-task policies.
Mohit Shridhar, Lucas Manuelli, Dieter Fox
83
Python
10/6/2021 Single-dataset Experts for Multi-dataset Question Answering
Many datasets have been created for training reading comprehension models, and a natural question is whether we can combine them to build models that (1) perform better on all of the training datasets and (2) generalize and transfer better to new datasets. Prior work has addressed this goal by training one network simultaneously on multiple datasets, which works well on average but is prone to over- or under-fitting different sub-distributions and might transfer worse compared to source models with more overlap with the target dataset. Our approach is to model multi-dataset question answering with a collection of single-dataset experts, by training a collection of lightweight, dataset-specific adapter modules (Houlsby et al., 2019) that share an underlying Transformer model. We find that these Multi-Adapter Dataset Experts (MADE) outperform all our baselines in terms of in-distribution accuracy, and simple methods based on parameter-averaging lead to better zero-shot generalization and few-shot transfer performance, offering a strong and versatile starting point for building new reading comprehension systems.
Dan Friedman, Ben Dodge, Danqi Chen
43
Python
10/6/2021 FewNLU: Benchmarking State-of-the-Art Methods for Few-Shot Natural Language Understanding
The few-shot natural language understanding (NLU) task has attracted much recent attention. However, prior methods have been evaluated under a disparate set of protocols, which hinders fair comparison and measuring progress of the field. To address this issue, we introduce an evaluation framework that improves previous evaluation procedures in three key aspects, i.e., test performance, dev-test correlation, and stability. Under this new evaluation framework, we re-evaluate several state-of-the-art few-shot methods for NLU tasks. Our framework reveals new insights: (1) both the absolute performance and relative gap of the methods were not accurately estimated in prior literature; (2) no single method dominates most tasks with consistent performance; (3) improvements of some methods diminish with a larger pretrained model; and (4) gains from different methods are often complementary and the best combined model performs close to a strong fully-supervised baseline. We open-source our toolkit, FewNLU, that implements our evaluation framework along with a number of state-of-the-art methods.
Yanan Zheng, Jing Zhou, Yujie Qian, Ming Ding, Jian Li, Ruslan Salakhutdinov, Jie Tang, Sebastian Ruder, Zhilin Yang
20
Python
10/6/2021 Learning Neural Templates for Recommender Dialogue System
Though recent end-to-end neural models have shown promising progress on Conversational Recommender System (CRS), two key challenges still remain. First, the recommended items cannot be always incorporated into the generated replies precisely and appropriately. Second, only the items mentioned in the training corpus have a chance to be recommended in the conversation. To tackle these challenges, we introduce a novel framework called NTRD for recommender dialogue system that decouples the dialogue generation from the item recommendation. NTRD has two key components, i.e., response template generator and item selector. The former adopts an encoder-decoder model to generate a response template with slot locations tied to target items, while the latter fills in slot locations with the proper items using a sufficient attention mechanism. Our approach combines the strengths of both classical slot filling approaches (that are generally controllable) and modern neural NLG approaches (that are generally more natural and accurate). Extensive experiments on the benchmark ReDial show our NTRD significantly outperforms the previous state-of-the-art methods. Besides, our approach has the unique advantage to produce novel items that do not appear in the training set of dialogue corpus. The code is available at \url{this https URL}.
Zujie Liang, Huang Hu, Can Xu, Jian Miao, Yingying He, Yining Chen, Xiubo Geng, Fan Liang, Daxin Jiang
8
Python
10/6/2021 Language Invariant Properties in Natural Language Processing
Meaning is context-dependent, but many properties of language (should) remain the same even if we transform the context. For example, sentiment, entailment, or speaker properties should be the same in a translation and original of a text. We introduce language invariant properties: i.e., properties that should not change when we transform text, and how they can be used to quantitatively evaluate the robustness of transformation algorithms. We use translation and paraphrasing as transformation examples, but our findings apply more broadly to any transformation. Our results indicate that many NLP transformations change properties like author characteristics, i.e., make them sound more male. We believe that studying these properties will allow NLP to address both social factors and pragmatic aspects of language. We also release an application suite that can be used to evaluate the invariance of transformation applications.
Federico Bianchi, Debora Nozza, Dirk Hovy
10
Python
10/6/2021 Semi-Supervised Text Classification via Self-Pretraining
We present a neural semi-supervised learning model termed Self-Pretraining. Our model is inspired by the classic self-training algorithm. However, as opposed to self-training, Self-Pretraining is threshold-free, it can potentially update its belief about previously labeled documents, and can cope with the semantic drift problem. Self-Pretraining is iterative and consists of two classifiers. In each iteration, one classifier draws a random set of unlabeled documents and labels them. This set is used to initialize the second classifier, to be further trained by the set of labeled documents. The algorithm proceeds to the next iteration and the classifiers' roles are reversed. To improve the flow of information across the iterations and also to cope with the semantic drift problem, Self-Pretraining employs an iterative distillation process, transfers hypotheses across the iterations, utilizes a two-stage training model, uses an efficient learning rate schedule, and employs a pseudo-label transformation heuristic. We have evaluated our model in three publicly available social media datasets. Our experiments show that Self-Pretraining outperforms the existing state-of-the-art semi-supervised classifiers across multiple settings. Our code is available at this https URL.
Payam Karisani, Negin Karisani
6
Python
10/6/2021 Multi-Task Pre-Training for Plug-and-Play Task-Oriented Dialogue System
Pre-trained language models have been recently shown to benefit task-oriented dialogue (TOD) systems. Despite their success, existing methods often formulate this task as a cascaded generation problem which can lead to error accumulation across different sub-tasks and greater data annotation overhead. In this study, we present PPTOD, a unified plug-and-play model for task-oriented dialogue. In addition, we introduce a new dialogue multi-task pre-training strategy that allows the model to learn the primary TOD task completion skills from heterogeneous dialog corpora. We extensively test our model on three benchmark TOD tasks, including end-to-end dialogue modelling, dialogue state tracking, and intent classification. Experimental results show that PPTOD achieves new state of the art on all evaluated tasks in both high-resource and low-resource scenarios. Furthermore, comparisons against previous SOTA methods show that the responses generated by PPTOD are more factually correct and semantically coherent as judged by human annotators.
Yixuan Su, Lei Shu, Elman Mansimov, Arshit Gupta, Deng Cai, Yi-An Lai, Yi Zhang
6
Python
10/6/2021 iFacetSum: Coreference-based Interactive Faceted Summarization for Multi-Document Exploration
We introduce iFacetSum, a web application for exploring topical document sets. iFacetSum integrates interactive summarization together with faceted search, by providing a novel faceted navigation scheme that yields abstractive summaries for the user's selections. This approach offers both a comprehensive overview as well as concise details regarding subtopics of choice. Fine-grained facets are automatically produced based on cross-document coreference pipelines, rendering generic concepts, entities and statements surfacing in the source texts. We analyze the effectiveness of our application through small-scale user studies, which suggest the usefulness of our approach.
Eran Hirsch, Alon Eirew, Ori Shapira, Avi Caciularu, Arie Cattan, Ori Ernst, Ramakanth Pasunuru, Hadar Ronen, Mohit Bansal, Ido Dagan
5
Jupyter Notebook
10/6/2021 Inducing Transformer's Compositional Generalization Ability via Auxiliary Sequence Prediction Tasks
Systematic compositionality is an essential mechanism in human language, allowing the recombination of known parts to create novel expressions. However, existing neural models have been shown to lack this basic ability in learning symbolic structures. Motivated by the failure of a Transformer model on the SCAN compositionality challenge (Lake and Baroni, 2018), which requires parsing a command into actions, we propose two auxiliary sequence prediction tasks that track the progress of function and argument semantics, as additional training supervision. These automatically-generated sequences are more representative of the underlying compositional symbolic structures of the input data. During inference, the model jointly predicts the next action and the next tokens in the auxiliary sequences at each step. Experiments on the SCAN dataset show that our method encourages the Transformer to understand compositional structures of the command, improving its accuracy on multiple challenging splits from <= 10% to 100%. With only 418 (5%) training instances, our approach still achieves 97.8% accuracy on the MCD1 split. Therefore, we argue that compositionality can be induced in Transformers given minimal but proper guidance. We also show that a better result is achieved using less contextualized vectors as the attention's query, providing insights into architecture choices in achieving systematic compositionality. Finally, we show positive generalization results on the groundedSCAN task (Ruis et al., 2020). Our code is publicly available at: this https URL
Yichen Jiang, Mohit Bansal
5
Python
10/6/2021 An animated picture says at least a thousand words: Selecting Gif-based Replies in Multimodal Dialog
Online conversations include more than just text. Increasingly, image-based responses such as memes and animated gifs serve as culturally recognized and often humorous responses in conversation. However, while NLP has broadened to multimodal models, conversational dialog systems have largely focused only on generating text replies. Here, we introduce a new dataset of 1.56M text-gif conversation turns and introduce a new multimodal conversational model Pepe the King Prawn for selecting gif-based replies. We demonstrate that our model produces relevant and high-quality gif responses and, in a large randomized control trial of multiple models replying to real users, we show that our model replies with gifs that are significantly better received by the community.
Xingyao Wang, David Jurgens
5
Python
10/6/2021 SD-QA: Spoken Dialectal Question Answering for the Real World
Question answering (QA) systems are now available through numerous commercial applications for a wide variety of domains, serving millions of users that interact with them via speech interfaces. However, current benchmarks in QA research do not account for the errors that speech recognition models might introduce, nor do they consider the language variations (dialects) of the users. To address this gap, we augment an existing QA dataset to construct a multi-dialect, spoken QA benchmark on five languages (Arabic, Bengali, English, Kiswahili, Korean) with more than 68k audio prompts in 24 dialects from 255 speakers. We provide baseline results showcasing the real-world performance of QA systems and analyze the effect of language variety and other sensitive speaker attributes on downstream performance. Last, we study the fairness of the ASR and QA models with respect to the underlying user populations. The dataset, model outputs, and code for reproducing all our experiments are available: this https URL.
Fahim Faisal, Sharlina Keshava, Md Mahfuz ibn Alam, Antonios Anastasopoulos
4
Jupyter Notebook
10/6/2021 VoxCeleb Enrichment for Age and Gender Recognition
VoxCeleb datasets are widely used in speaker recognition studies. Our work serves two purposes. First, we provide speaker age labels and (an alternative) annotation of speaker gender. Second, we demonstrate the use of this metadata by constructing age and gender recognition models with different features and classifiers. We query different celebrity databases and apply consensus rules to derive age and gender labels. We also compare the original VoxCeleb gender labels with our labels to identify records that might be mislabeled in the original VoxCeleb data. On modeling side, we design a comprehensive study of multiple features and models for recognizing gender and age. Our best system, using i-vector features, achieved an F1-score of 0.9829 for gender recognition task using logistic regression, and the lowest mean absolute error (MAE) in age regression, 9.443 years, is obtained with ridge regression. This indicates challenge in age estimation from in-the-wild style speech data.
Khaled Hechmi, Trung Ngo Trong, Ville Hautamaki, Tomi Kinnunen
7
Jupyter Notebook
10/6/2021 GERNERMED -- An Open German Medical NER Model
The current state of adoption of well-structured electronic health records and integration of digital methods for storing medical patient data in structured formats can often considered as inferior compared to the use of traditional, unstructured text based patient data documentation. Data mining in the field of medical data analysis often needs to rely solely on processing of unstructured data to retrieve relevant data. In natural language processing (NLP), statistical models have been shown successful in various tasks like part-of-speech tagging, relation extraction (RE) and named entity recognition (NER). In this work, we present GERNERMED, the first open, neural NLP model for NER tasks dedicated to detect medical entity types in German text data. Here, we avoid the conflicting goals of protection of sensitive patient data from training data extraction and the publication of the statistical model weights by training our model on a custom dataset that was translated from publicly available datasets in foreign language by a pretrained neural machine translation model. The sample code and the statistical model is available at: this https URL
Johann Frei, Frank Kramer
3
Python
10/6/2021 Challenging the Semi-Supervised VAE Framework for Text Classification
Semi-Supervised Variational Autoencoders (SSVAEs) are widely used models for data efficient learning. In this paper, we question the adequacy of the standard design of sequence SSVAEs for the task of text classification as we exhibit two sources of overcomplexity for which we provide simplifications. These simplifications to SSVAEs preserve their theoretical soundness while providing a number of practical advantages in the semi-supervised setup where the result of training is a text classifier. These simplifications are the removal of (i) the Kullback-Liebler divergence from its objective and (ii) the fully unobserved latent variable from its probabilistic model. These changes relieve users from choosing a prior for their latent variables, make the model smaller and faster, and allow for a better flow of information into the latent variables. We compare the simplified versions to standard SSVAEs on 4 text classification tasks. On top of the above-mentioned simplification, experiments show a speed-up of 26%, while keeping equivalent classification scores. The code to reproduce our experiments is public.
Ghazi Felhi, Joseph Le Roux, Djame Seddah
3
Python
10/6/2021 Pushing on Text Readability Assessment: A Transformer Meets Handcrafted Linguistic Features
We report two essential improvements in readability assessment: 1. three novel features in advanced semantics and 2. the timely evidence that traditional ML models (e.g. Random Forest, using handcrafted features) can combine with transformers (e.g. RoBERTa) to augment model performance. First, we explore suitable transformers and traditional ML models. Then, we extract 255 handcrafted linguistic features using self-developed extraction software. Finally, we assemble those to create several hybrid models, achieving state-of-the-art (SOTA) accuracy on popular datasets in readability assessment. The use of handcrafted features help model performance on smaller datasets. Notably, our RoBERTA-RF-T1 hybrid achieves the near-perfect classification accuracy of 99%, a 20.3% increase from the previous SOTA.
Bruce W. Lee, Yoo Sung Jang, Jason Hyung-Jong Lee
2
Python
10/6/2021 Classifying Dyads for Militarized Conflict Analysis
Understanding the origins of militarized conflict is a complex, yet important undertaking. Existing research seeks to build this understanding by considering bi-lateral relationships between entity pairs (dyadic causes) and multi-lateral relationships among multiple entities (systemic causes). The aim of this work is to compare these two causes in terms of how they correlate with conflict between two entities. We do this by devising a set of textual and graph-based features which represent each of the causes. The features are extracted from Wikipedia and modeled as a large graph. Nodes in this graph represent entities connected by labeled edges representing ally or enemy-relationships. This allows casting the problem as an edge classification task, which we term dyad classification. We propose and evaluate classifiers to determine if a particular pair of entities are allies or enemies. Our results suggest that our systemic features might be slightly better correlates of conflict. Further, we find that Wikipedia articles of allies are semantically more similar than enemies.
Niklas Stoehr, Lucas Torroba Hennigen, Samin Ahbab, Robert West, Ryan Cotterell
2
Jupyter Notebook
10/6/2021 MultiDoc2Dial: Modeling Dialogues Grounded in Multiple Documents
We propose MultiDoc2Dial, a new task and dataset on modeling goal-oriented dialogues grounded in multiple documents. Most previous works treat document-grounded dialogue modeling as a machine reading comprehension task based on a single given document or passage. In this work, we aim to address more realistic scenarios where a goal-oriented information-seeking conversation involves multiple topics, and hence is grounded on different documents. To facilitate such a task, we introduce a new dataset that contains dialogues grounded in multiple documents from four different domains. We also explore modeling the dialogue-based and document-based context in the dataset. We present strong baseline approaches and various experimental results, aiming to support further research efforts on such a task.
Song Feng, Siva Sankalp Patel, Hui Wan, Sachindra Joshi
5
Python
10/6/2021 MatSciBERT: A Materials Domain Language Model for Text Mining and Information Extraction
An overwhelmingly large amount of knowledge in the materials domain is generated and stored as text published in peer-reviewed scientific literature. Recent developments in natural language processing, such as bidirectional encoder representations from transformers (BERT) models, provide promising tools to extract information from these texts. However, direct application of these models in the materials domain may yield suboptimal results as the models themselves may not be trained on notations and jargon that are specific to the domain. Here, we present a materials-aware language model, namely, MatSciBERT, which is trained on a large corpus of scientific literature published in the materials domain. We further evaluate the performance of MatSciBERT on three downstream tasks, namely, abstract classification, named entity recognition, and relation extraction, on different materials datasets. We show that MatSciBERT outperforms SciBERT, a language model trained on science corpus, on all the tasks. Further, we discuss some of the applications of MatSciBERT in the materials domain for extracting information, which can, in turn, contribute to materials discovery or optimization. Finally, to make the work accessible to the larger materials community, we make the pretrained and finetuned weights and the models of MatSciBERT freely accessible.
Tanishq Gupta, Mohd Zaki, N. M. Anoop Krishnan, Mausam
2
Python
10/6/2021 Effective Use of Graph Convolution Network and Contextual Sub-Tree forCommodity News Event Extraction
Event extraction in commodity news is a less researched area as compared to generic event extraction. However, accurate event extraction from commodity news is useful in abroad range of applications such as under-standing event chains and learning event-event relations, which can then be used for commodity price prediction. The events found in commodity news exhibit characteristics different from generic events, hence posing a unique challenge in event extraction using existing methods. This paper proposes an effective use of Graph Convolutional Networks(GCN) with a pruned dependency parse tree, termed contextual sub-tree, for better event ex-traction in commodity news. The event ex-traction model is trained using feature embed-dings from ComBERT, a BERT-based masked language model that was produced through domain-adaptive pre-training on a commodity news corpus. Experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed solution, which out-performs existing methods with F1 scores as high as 0.90. Furthermore, our pre-trained language model outperforms GloVe by 23%, and BERT and RoBERTa by 7% in terms of argument roles classification. For the goal of re-producibility, the code and trained models are made publicly available1.
Meisin Lee, Lay-Ki Soon, Eu-Gene Siew
2
Python
10/6/2021 RuleBert: Teaching Soft Rules to Pre-trained Language Models
While pre-trained language models (PLMs) are the go-to solution to tackle many natural language processing problems, they are still very limited in their ability to capture and to use common-sense knowledge. In fact, even if information is available in the form of approximate (soft) logical rules, it is not clear how to transfer it to a PLM in order to improve its performance for deductive reasoning tasks. Here, we aim to bridge this gap by teaching PLMs how to reason with soft Horn rules. We introduce a classification task where, given facts and soft rules, the PLM should return a prediction with a probability for a given hypothesis. We release the first dataset for this task, and we propose a revised loss function that enables the PLM to learn how to predict precise probabilities for the task. Our evaluation results show that the resulting fine-tuned models achieve very high performance, even on logical rules that were unseen at training. Moreover, we demonstrate that logical notions expressed by the rules are transferred to the fine-tuned model, yielding state-of-the-art results on external datasets.
Mohammed Saeed, Naser Ahmadi, Preslav Nakov, Paolo Papotti
2
Python
10/6/2021 Parallel Refinements for Lexically Constrained Text Generation with BART
Lexically constrained text generation aims to control the generated text by incorporating some pre-specified keywords into the output. Previous work injects lexical constraints into the output by controlling the decoding process or refining the candidate output iteratively, which tends to generate generic or ungrammatical sentences, and has high computational complexity. To address these challenges, we propose Constrained BART (CBART) for lexically constrained text generation. CBART leverages the pre-trained model BART and transfers part of the generation burden from the decoder to the encoder by decomposing this task into two sub-tasks, thereby improving the sentence quality. Concretely, we extend BART by adding a token-level classifier over the encoder, aiming at instructing the decoder where to replace and insert. Guided by the encoder, the decoder refines multiple tokens of the input in one step by inserting tokens before specific positions and re-predicting tokens with low confidence. To further reduce the inference latency, the decoder predicts all tokens in parallel. Experiment results on One-Billion-Word and Yelp show that CBART can generate plausible text with high quality and diversity while significantly accelerating inference.
Xingwei He
2
Python
10/6/2021 RAFT: A Real-World Few-Shot Text Classification Benchmark
Large pre-trained language models have shown promise for few-shot learning, completing text-based tasks given only a few task-specific examples. Will models soon solve classification tasks that have so far been reserved for human research assistants? Existing benchmarks are not designed to measure progress in applied settings, and so don't directly answer this question. The RAFT benchmark (Real-world Annotated Few-shot Tasks) focuses on naturally occurring tasks and uses an evaluation setup that mirrors deployment. Baseline evaluations on RAFT reveal areas current techniques struggle with: reasoning over long texts and tasks with many classes. Human baselines show that some classification tasks are difficult for non-expert humans, reflecting that real-world value sometimes depends on domain expertise. Yet even non-expert human baseline F1 scores exceed GPT-3 by an average of 0.11. The RAFT datasets and leaderboard will track which model improvements translate into real-world benefits at this https URL .
Neel Alex, Eli Lifland, Lewis Tunstall, Abhishek Thakur, Pegah Maham, C. Jess Riedel, Emmie Hine, Carolyn Ashurst, Paul Sedille, Alexis Carlier, Michael Noetel, Andreas Stuhlmuller
2
Python
10/6/2021 Can phones, syllables, and words emerge as side-products of cross-situational audiovisual learning? -- A computational investigation
Decades of research has studied how language learning infants learn to discriminate speech sounds, segment words, and associate words with their meanings. While gradual development of such capabilities is unquestionable, the exact nature of these skills and the underlying mental representations yet remains unclear. In parallel, computational studies have shown that basic comprehension of speech can be achieved by statistical learning between speech and concurrent referentially ambiguous visual input. These models can operate without prior linguistic knowledge such as representations of linguistic units, and without learning mechanisms specifically targeted at such units. This has raised the question of to what extent knowledge of linguistic units, such as phone(me)s, syllables, and words, could actually emerge as latent representations supporting the translation between speech and representations in other modalities, and without the units being proximal learning targets for the learner. In this study, we formulate this idea as the so-called latent language hypothesis (LLH), connecting linguistic representation learning to general predictive processing within and across sensory modalities. We review the extent that the audiovisual aspect of LLH is supported by the existing computational studies. We then explore LLH further in extensive learning simulations with different neural network models for audiovisual cross-situational learning, and comparing learning from both synthetic and real speech data. We investigate whether the latent representations learned by the networks reflect phonetic, syllabic, or lexical structure of input speech by utilizing an array of complementary evaluation metrics related to linguistic selectivity and temporal characteristics of the representations. As a result, we find that representations associated...
Khazar Khorrami, Okko Rasanen
2
Python
10/6/2021 Automatic Generation of Word Problems for Academic Education via Natural Language Processing (NLP)
Digital learning platforms enable students to learn on a flexible and individual schedule as well as providing instant feedback mechanisms. The field of STEM education requires students to solve numerous training exercises to grasp underlying concepts. It is apparent that there are restrictions in current online education in terms of exercise diversity and individuality. Many exercises show little variance in structure and content, hindering the adoption of abstraction capabilities by students. This thesis proposes an approach to generate diverse, context rich word problems. In addition to requiring the generated language to be grammatically correct, the nature of word problems implies additional constraints on the validity of contents. The proposed approach is proven to be effective in generating valid word problems for mathematical statistics. The experimental results present a tradeoff between generation time and exercise validity. The system can easily be parametrized to handle this tradeoff according to the requirements of specific use cases.
Stanley Uros Keller
2
Python
10/6/2021 Multi-granular Legal Topic Classification on Greek Legislation
In this work, we study the task of classifying legal texts written in the Greek language. We introduce and make publicly available a novel dataset based on Greek legislation, consisting of more than 47 thousand official, categorized Greek legislation resources. We experiment with this dataset and evaluate a battery of advanced methods and classifiers, ranging from traditional machine learning and RNN-based methods to state-of-the-art Transformer-based methods. We show that recurrent architectures with domain-specific word embeddings offer improved overall performance while being competitive even to transformer-based models. Finally, we show that cutting-edge multilingual and monolingual transformer-based models brawl on the top of the classifiers' ranking, making us question the necessity of training monolingual transfer learning models as a rule of thumb. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the task of Greek legal text classification is considered in an open research project, while also Greek is a language with very limited NLP resources in general.
Christos Papaloukas, Ilias Chalkidis, Konstantinos Athinaios, Despina-Athanasia Pantazi, Manolis Koubarakis
1
Python
10/6/2021 MFAQ: a Multilingual FAQ Dataset
In this paper, we present the first multilingual FAQ dataset publicly available. We collected around 6M FAQ pairs from the web, in 21 different languages. Although this is significantly larger than existing FAQ retrieval datasets, it comes with its own challenges: duplication of content and uneven distribution of topics. We adopt a similar setup as Dense Passage Retrieval (DPR) and test various bi-encoders on this dataset. Our experiments reveal that a multilingual model based on XLM-RoBERTa achieves the best results, except for English. Lower resources languages seem to learn from one another as a multilingual model achieves a higher MRR than language-specific ones. Our qualitative analysis reveals the brittleness of the model on simple word changes. We publicly release our dataset, model and training script.
Maxime De Bruyn, Ehsan Lotfi, Jeska Buhmann, Walter Daelemans
5
Python
10/6/2021 Temporal Information and Event Markup Language: TIE-ML Markup Process and Schema Version 1.0
Temporal Information and Event Markup Language (TIE-ML) is a markup strategy and annotation schema to improve the productivity and accuracy of temporal and event related annotation of corpora to facilitate machine learning based model training. For the annotation of events, temporal sequencing, and durations, it is significantly simpler by providing an extremely reduced tag set for just temporal relations and event enumeration. In comparison to other standards, as for example the Time Markup Language (TimeML), it is much easier to use by dropping sophisticated formalisms, theoretical concepts, and annotation approaches. Annotations of corpora using TimeML can be mapped to TIE-ML with a loss, and TIE-ML annotations can be fully mapped to TimeML with certain under-specification.
Damir Cavar, Billy Dickson, Ali Aljubailan, Soyoung Kim
1
10/6/2021 Agreeing to Disagree: Annotating Offensive Language Datasets with Annotators' Disagreement
Since state-of-the-art approaches to offensive language detection rely on supervised learning, it is crucial to quickly adapt them to the continuously evolving scenario of social media. While several approaches have been proposed to tackle the problem from an algorithmic perspective, so to reduce the need for annotated data, less attention has been paid to the quality of these data. Following a trend that has emerged recently, we focus on the level of agreement among annotators while selecting data to create offensive language datasets, a task involving a high level of subjectivity. Our study comprises the creation of three novel datasets of English tweets covering different topics and having five crowd-sourced judgments each. We also present an extensive set of experiments showing that selecting training and test data according to different levels of annotators' agreement has a strong effect on classifiers performance and robustness. Our findings are further validated in cross-domain experiments and studied using a popular benchmark dataset. We show that such hard cases, where low agreement is present, are not necessarily due to poor-quality annotation and we advocate for a higher presence of ambiguous cases in future datasets, particularly in test sets, to better account for the different points of view expressed online.
Elisa Leonardelli, Stefano Menini, Alessio Palmero Aprosio, Marco Guerini, Sara Tonelli
1
10/6/2021 Shaking Syntactic Trees on the Sesame Street: Multilingual Probing with Controllable Perturbations
Recent research has adopted a new experimental field centered around the concept of text perturbations which has revealed that shuffled word order has little to no impact on the downstream performance of Transformer-based language models across many NLP tasks. These findings contradict the common understanding of how the models encode hierarchical and structural information and even question if the word order is modeled with position embeddings. To this end, this paper proposes nine probing datasets organized by the type of \emph{controllable} text perturbation for three Indo-European languages with a varying degree of word order flexibility: English, Swedish and Russian. Based on the probing analysis of the M-BERT and M-BART models, we report that the syntactic sensitivity depends on the language and model pre-training objectives. We also find that the sensitivity grows across layers together with the increase of the perturbation granularity. Last but not least, we show that the models barely use the positional information to induce syntactic trees from their intermediate self-attention and contextualized representations.
Ekaterina Taktasheva, Vladislav Mikhailov, Ekaterina Artemova
1
Python
10/6/2021 SlovakBERT: Slovak Masked Language Model
We introduce a new Slovak masked language model called SlovakBERT in this paper. It is the first Slovak-only transformers-based model trained on a sizeable corpus. We evaluate the model on several NLP tasks and achieve state-of-the-art results. We publish the masked language model, as well as the subsequently fine-tuned models for part-of-speech tagging, sentiment analysis and semantic textual similarity.
Matus Pikuliak, Stefan Grivalsky, Martin Konopka, Miroslav Blstak, Martin Tamajka, Viktor Bachraty, Marian Simko, Pavol Balazik, Michal Trnka, Filip Uhlarik
1
10/6/2021 Automated Mining of Leaderboards for Empirical AI Research
With the rapid growth of research publications, empowering scientists to keep oversight over the scientific progress is of paramount importance. In this regard, the Leaderboards facet of information organization provides an overview on the state-of-the-art by aggregating empirical results from various studies addressing the same research challenge. Crowdsourcing efforts like PapersWithCode among others are devoted to the construction of Leaderboards predominantly for various subdomains in Artificial Intelligence. Leaderboards provide machine-readable scholarly knowledge that has proven to be directly useful for scientists to keep track of research progress. The construction of Leaderboards could be greatly expedited with automated text mining. This study presents a comprehensive approach for generating Leaderboards for knowledge-graph-based scholarly information organization. Specifically, we investigate the problem of automated Leaderboard construction using state-of-the-art transformer models, viz. Bert, SciBert, and XLNet. Our analysis reveals an optimal approach that significantly outperforms existing baselines for the task with evaluation scores above 90% in F1. This, in turn, offers new state-of-the-art results for Leaderboard extraction. As a result, a vast share of empirical AI research can be organized in the next-generation digital libraries as knowledge graphs.
Salomon Kabongo, Jennifer D'Souza, Soren Auer
1
Jupyter Notebook
10/6/2021 Text Simplification for Comprehension-based Question-Answering
Text simplification is the process of splitting and rephrasing a sentence to a sequence of sentences making it easier to read and understand while preserving the content and approximating the original meaning. Text simplification has been exploited in NLP applications like machine translation, summarization, semantic role labeling, and information extraction, opening a broad avenue for its exploitation in comprehension-based question-answering downstream tasks. In this work, we investigate the effect of text simplification in the task of question-answering using a comprehension context. We release Simple-SQuAD, a simplified version of the widely-used SQuAD dataset. Firstly, we outline each step in the dataset creation pipeline, including style transfer, thresholding of sentences showing correct transfer, and offset finding for each answer. Secondly, we verify the quality of the transferred sentences through various methodologies involving both automated and human evaluation. Thirdly, we benchmark the newly created corpus and perform an ablation study for examining the effect of the simplification process in the SQuAD-based question answering task. Our experiments show that simplification leads to up to 2.04% and 1.74% increase in Exact Match and F1, respectively. Finally, we conclude with an analysis of the transfer process, investigating the types of edits made by the model, and the effect of sentence length on the transfer model.
Tanvi Dadu, Kartikey Pant, Seema Nagar, Ferdous Ahmed Barbhuiya, Kuntal Dey
1
10/6/2021 Progressive Adversarial Learning for Bootstrapping: A Case Study on Entity Set Expansion
Bootstrapping has become the mainstream method for entity set expansion. Conventional bootstrapping methods mostly define the expansion boundary using seed-based distance metrics, which heavily depend on the quality of selected seeds and are hard to be adjusted due to the extremely sparse supervision. In this paper, we propose BootstrapGAN, a new learning method for bootstrapping which jointly models the bootstrapping process and the boundary learning process in a GAN framework. Specifically, the expansion boundaries of different bootstrapping iterations are learned via different discriminator networks; the bootstrapping network is the generator to generate new positive entities, and the discriminator networks identify the expansion boundaries by trying to distinguish the generated entities from known positive entities. By iteratively performing the above adversarial learning, the generator and the discriminators can reinforce each other and be progressively refined along the whole bootstrapping process. Experiments show that BootstrapGAN achieves the new state-of-the-art entity set expansion performance.
Lingyong Yan, Xianpei Han, Le Sun
1
Python
10/6/2021 Mitigating Racial Biases in Toxic Language Detection with an Equity-Based Ensemble Framework
Recent research has demonstrated how racial biases against users who write African American English exists in popular toxic language datasets. While previous work has focused on a single fairness criteria, we propose to use additional descriptive fairness metrics to better understand the source of these biases. We demonstrate that different benchmark classifiers, as well as two in-process bias-remediation techniques, propagate racial biases even in a larger corpus. We then propose a novel ensemble-framework that uses a specialized classifier that is fine-tuned to the African American English dialect. We show that our proposed framework substantially reduces the racial biases that the model learns from these datasets. We demonstrate how the ensemble framework improves fairness metrics across all sample datasets with minimal impact on the classification performance, and provide empirical evidence in its ability to unlearn the annotation biases towards authors who use African American English. ** Please note that this work may contain examples of offensive words and phrases.
Matan Halevy, Camille Harris, Amy Bruckman, Diyi Yang, Ayanna Howard
1
Jupyter Notebook
10/6/2021 Micromodels for Efficient, Explainable, and Reusable Systems: A Case Study on Mental Health
Many statistical models have high accuracy on test benchmarks, but are not explainable, struggle in low-resource scenarios, cannot be reused for multiple tasks, and cannot easily integrate domain expertise. These factors limit their use, particularly in settings such as mental health, where it is difficult to annotate datasets and model outputs have significant impact. We introduce a micromodel architecture to address these challenges. Our approach allows researchers to build interpretable representations that embed domain knowledge and provide explanations throughout the model's decision process. We demonstrate the idea on multiple mental health tasks: depression classification, PTSD classification, and suicidal risk assessment. Our systems consistently produce strong results, even in low-resource scenarios, and are more interpretable than alternative methods.
Andrew Lee, Jonathan K. Kummerfeld, Lawrence C. An, Rada Mihalcea
1
Python
10/6/2021 Recall and Learn: A Memory-augmented Solver for Math Word Problems
In this article, we tackle the math word problem, namely, automatically answering a mathematical problem according to its textual description. Although recent methods have demonstrated their promising results, most of these methods are based on template-based generation scheme which results in limited generalization capability. To this end, we propose a novel human-like analogical learning method in a recall and learn manner. Our proposed framework is composed of modules of memory, representation, analogy, and reasoning, which are designed to make a new exercise by referring to the exercises learned in the past. Specifically, given a math word problem, the model first retrieves similar questions by a memory module and then encodes the unsolved problem and each retrieved question using a representation module. Moreover, to solve the problem in a way of analogy, an analogy module and a reasoning module with a copy mechanism are proposed to model the interrelationship between the problem and each retrieved question. Extensive experiments on two well-known datasets show the superiority of our proposed algorithm as compared to other state-of-the-art competitors from both overall performance comparison and micro-scope studies.
Shifeng Huang, Jiawei Wang, Jiao Xu, Da Cao, Ming Yang
1
Python
10/6/2021 Adaptive Approach For Sparse Representations Using The Locally Competitive Algorithm For Audio
Gammachirp filterbank has been used to approximate the cochlea in sparse coding algorithms. An oriented grid search optimization was applied to adapt the gammachirp's parameters and improve the Matching Pursuit (MP) algorithm's sparsity along with the reconstruction quality. However, this combination of a greedy algorithm with a grid search at each iteration is computationally demanding and not suitable for real-time applications. This paper presents an adaptive approach to optimize the gammachirp's parameters but in the context of the Locally Competitive Algorithm (LCA) that requires much fewer computations than MP. The proposed method consists of taking advantage of the LCA's neural architecture to automatically adapt the gammachirp's filterbank using the backpropagation algorithm. Results demonstrate an improvement in the LCA's performance with our approach in terms of sparsity, reconstruction quality, and convergence time. This approach can yield a significant advantage over existing approaches for real-time applications.
Soufiyan Bahadi, Jean Rouat, Eric Plourde
1
Python
10/6/2021 Improving Stack Overflow question title generation with copying enhanced CodeBERT model and bi-modal information
Context: Stack Overflow is very helpful for software developers who are seeking answers to programming problems. Previous studies have shown that a growing number of questions are of low-quality and thus obtain less attention from potential answerers. Gao et al. proposed a LSTM-based model (i.e., BiLSTM-CC) to automatically generate question titles from the code snippets to improve the question quality. However, only using the code snippets in question body cannot provide sufficient information for title generation, and LSTMs cannot capture the long-range dependencies between tokens. Objective: We propose CCBERT, a deep learning based novel model to enhance the performance of question title generation by making full use of the bi-modal information of the entire question body. Methods: CCBERT follows the encoder-decoder paradigm, and uses CodeBERT to encode the question body into hidden representations, a stacked Transformer decoder to generate predicted tokens, and an additional copy attention layer to refine the output distribution. Both the encoder and decoder perform the multi-head self-attention operation to better capture the long-range dependencies. We build a dataset containing more than 120,000 high-quality questions filtered from the data officially published by Stack Overflow to verify the effectiveness of the CCBERT model. Results: CCBERT achieves a better performance on the dataset, and especially outperforms BiLSTM-CC and a multi-purpose pre-trained model (BART) by 14% and 4% on average, respectively. Experiments on both code-only and low-resource datasets also show the superiority of CCBERT with less performance degradation, which are 40% and 13.5% for BiLSTM-CC, while 24% and 5% for CCBERT, respectively.
Fengji Zhang, Jacky Keung, Xiao Yu, Zhiwen Xie, Zhen Yang, Caoyuan Ma, Zhimin Zhang
1
Python
10/6/2021 Faithful Target Attribute Prediction in Neural Machine Translation
The training data used in NMT is rarely controlled with respect to specific attributes, such as word casing or gender, which can cause errors in translations. We argue that predicting the target word and attributes simultaneously is an effective way to ensure that translations are more faithful to the training data distribution with respect to these attributes. Experimental results on two tasks, uppercased input translation and gender prediction, show that this strategy helps mirror the training data distribution in testing. It also facilitates data augmentation on the task of uppercased input translation.
Xing Niu, Georgiana Dinu, Prashant Mathur, Anna Currey
0
10/6/2021 Does referent predictability affect the choice of referential form? A computational approach using masked coreference resolution
It is often posited that more predictable parts of a speaker's meaning tend to be made less explicit, for instance using shorter, less informative words. Studying these dynamics in the domain of referring expressions has proven difficult, with existing studies, both psycholinguistic and corpus-based, providing contradictory results. We test the hypothesis that speakers produce less informative referring expressions (e.g., pronouns vs. full noun phrases) when the context is more informative about the referent, using novel computational estimates of referent predictability. We obtain these estimates training an existing coreference resolution system for English on a new task, masked coreference resolution, giving us a probability distribution over referents that is conditioned on the context but not the referring expression. The resulting system retains standard coreference resolution performance while yielding a better estimate of human-derived referent predictability than previous attempts. A statistical analysis of the relationship between model output and mention form supports the hypothesis that predictability affects the form of a mention, both its morphosyntactic type and its length.
Laura Aina, Xixian Liao, Gemma Boleda, Matthijs Westera
0
Python
10/6/2021 A Graph-Based Neural Model for End-to-End Frame Semantic Parsing
Frame semantic parsing is a semantic analysis task based on FrameNet which has received great attention recently. The task usually involves three subtasks sequentially: (1) target identification, (2) frame classification and (3) semantic role labeling. The three subtasks are closely related while previous studies model them individually, which ignores their intern connections and meanwhile induces error propagation problem. In this work, we propose an end-to-end neural model to tackle the task jointly. Concretely, we exploit a graph-based method, regarding frame semantic parsing as a graph construction problem. All predicates and roles are treated as graph nodes, and their relations are taken as graph edges. Experiment results on two benchmark datasets of frame semantic parsing show that our method is highly competitive, resulting in better performance than pipeline models.
Zhichao Lin, Yueheng Sun, Meishan Zhang
1
Python
10/6/2021 Expectation-based Minimalist Grammars
Expectation-based Minimalist Grammars (e-MGs) are simplified versions of the (Conflated) Minimalist Grammars, (C)MGs, formalized by Stabler (Stabler, 2011, 2013, 1997) and Phase-based Minimalist Grammars, PMGs (Chesi, 2005, 2007; Stabler, 2011). The crucial simplification consists of driving structure building only by relying on lexically encoded categorial top-down expectations. The commitment on a top-down derivation (as in e-MGs and PMGs, as opposed to (C)MGs, Chomsky, 1995; Stabler, 2011) allows us to define a core derivation that should be the same in both parsing and generation (Momma & Phillips, 2018).
Cristiano Chesi
0
Python
10/6/2021 Compositional generalization in semantic parsing with pretrained transformers
Large-scale pretraining instills large amounts of knowledge in deep neural networks. This, in turn, improves the generalization behavior of these models in downstream tasks. What exactly are the limits to the generalization benefits of large-scale pretraining? Here, we report observations from some simple experiments aimed at addressing this question in the context of two semantic parsing tasks involving natural language, SCAN and COGS. We show that language models pretrained exclusively with non-English corpora, or even with programming language corpora, significantly improve out-of-distribution generalization in these benchmarks, compared with models trained from scratch, even though both benchmarks are English-based. This demonstrates the surprisingly broad transferability of pretrained representations and knowledge. Pretraining with a large-scale protein sequence prediction task, on the other hand, mostly deteriorates the generalization performance in SCAN and COGS, suggesting that pretrained representations do not transfer universally and that there are constraints on the similarity between the pretraining and downstream domains for successful transfer. Finally, we show that larger models are harder to train from scratch and their generalization accuracy is lower when trained up to convergence on the relatively small SCAN and COGS datasets, but the benefits of large-scale pretraining become much clearer with larger models.
A. Emin Orhan
0
Python
10/6/2021 BiQUE: Biquaternionic Embeddings of Knowledge Graphs
Knowledge graph embeddings (KGEs) compactly encode multi-relational knowledge graphs (KGs). Existing KGE models rely on geometric operations to model relational patterns. Euclidean (circular) rotation is useful for modeling patterns such as symmetry, but cannot represent hierarchical semantics. In contrast, hyperbolic models are effective at modeling hierarchical relations, but do not perform as well on patterns on which circular rotation excels. It is crucial for KGE models to unify multiple geometric transformations so as to fully cover the multifarious relations in KGs. To do so, we propose BiQUE, a novel model that employs biquaternions to integrate multiple geometric transformations, viz., scaling, translation, Euclidean rotation, and hyperbolic rotation. BiQUE makes the best trade-offs among geometric operators during training, picking the best one (or their best combination) for each relation. Experiments on five datasets show BiQUE's effectiveness.
Jia Guo, Stanley Kok
0
Python
10/6/2021 Jointly Learning to Repair Code and Generate Commit Message
We propose a novel task of jointly repairing program codes and generating commit messages. Code repair and commit message generation are two essential and related tasks for software development. However, existing work usually performs the two tasks independently. We construct a multilingual triple dataset including buggy code, fixed code, and commit messages for this novel task. We provide the cascaded models as baseline, which are enhanced with different training approaches, including the teacher-student method, the multi-task method, and the back-translation method. To deal with the error propagation problem of the cascaded method, the joint model is proposed that can both repair the code and generate the commit message in a unified framework. Experimental results show that the enhanced cascaded model with teacher-student method and multitask-learning method achieves the best score on different metrics of automated code repair, and the joint model behaves better than the cascaded model on commit message generation.
Jiaqi Bai, Long Zhou, Ambrosio Blanco, Shujie Liu, Furu Wei, Ming Zhou, Zhoujun Li
1
10/6/2021 An Analysis of Euclidean vs. Graph-Based Framing for Bilingual Lexicon Induction from Word Embedding Spaces
Much recent work in bilingual lexicon induction (BLI) views word embeddings as vectors in Euclidean space. As such, BLI is typically solved by finding a linear transformation that maps embeddings to a common space. Alternatively, word embeddings may be understood as nodes in a weighted graph. This framing allows us to examine a node's graph neighborhood without assuming a linear transform, and exploits new techniques from the graph matching optimization literature. These contrasting approaches have not been compared in BLI so far. In this work, we study the behavior of Euclidean versus graph-based approaches to BLI under differing data conditions and show that they complement each other when combined. We release our code at this https URL.
Kelly Marchisio, Youngser Park, Ali Saad-Eldin, Anton Alyakin, Kevin Duh, Carey Priebe, Philipp Koehn
0
10/6/2021 Visually Grounded Reasoning across Languages and Cultures
The design of widespread vision-and-language datasets and pre-trained encoders directly adopts, or draws inspiration from, the concepts and images of ImageNet. While one can hardly overestimate how much this benchmark contributed to progress in computer vision, it is mostly derived from lexical databases and image queries in English, resulting in source material with a North American or Western European bias. Therefore, we devise a new protocol to construct an ImageNet-style hierarchy representative of more languages and cultures. In particular, we let the selection of both concepts and images be entirely driven by native speakers, rather than scraping them automatically. Specifically, we focus on a typologically diverse set of languages, namely, Indonesian, Mandarin Chinese, Swahili, Tamil, and Turkish. On top of the concepts and images obtained through this new protocol, we create a multilingual dataset for {M}ulticultur{a}l {R}easoning over {V}ision and {L}anguage (MaRVL) by eliciting statements from native speaker annotators about pairs of images. The task consists of discriminating whether each grounded statement is true or false. We establish a series of baselines using state-of-the-art models and find that their cross-lingual transfer performance lags dramatically behind supervised performance in English. These results invite us to reassess the robustness and accuracy of current state-of-the-art models beyond a narrow domain, but also open up new exciting challenges for the development of truly multilingual and multicultural systems.
Fangyu Liu, Emanuele Bugliarello, Edoardo Maria Ponti, Siva Reddy, Nigel Collier, Desmond Elliott
0
10/6/2021 Improving Question Answering Performance Using Knowledge Distillation and Active Learning
Contemporary question answering (QA) systems, including transformer-based architectures, suffer from increasing computational and model complexity which render them inefficient for real-world applications with limited resources. Further, training or even fine-tuning such models requires a vast amount of labeled data which is often not available for the task at hand. In this manuscript, we conduct a comprehensive analysis of the mentioned challenges and introduce suitable countermeasures. We propose a novel knowledge distillation (KD) approach to reduce the parameter and model complexity of a pre-trained BERT system and utilize multiple active learning (AL) strategies for immense reduction in annotation efforts. In particular, we demonstrate that our model achieves the performance of a 6-layer TinyBERT and DistilBERT, whilst using only 2% of their total parameters. Finally, by the integration of our AL approaches into the BERT framework, we show that state-of-the-art results on the SQuAD dataset can be achieved when we only use 20% of the training data.
Yasaman Boreshban, Seyed Morteza Mirbostani, Gholamreza Ghassem-Sani, Seyed Abolghasem Mirroshandel, Shahin Amiriparian
0
Python
10/6/2021 Leveraging Pretrained Models for Automatic Summarization of Doctor-Patient Conversations
Fine-tuning pretrained models for automatically summarizing doctor-patient conversation transcripts presents many challenges: limited training data, significant domain shift, long and noisy transcripts, and high target summary variability. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of using pretrained transformer models for automatically summarizing doctor-patient conversations directly from transcripts. We show that fluent and adequate summaries can be generated with limited training data by fine-tuning BART on a specially constructed dataset. The resulting models greatly surpass the performance of an average human annotator and the quality of previous published work for the task. We evaluate multiple methods for handling long conversations, comparing them to the obvious baseline of truncating the conversation to fit the pretrained model length limit. We introduce a multistage approach that tackles the task by learning two fine-tuned models: one for summarizing conversation chunks into partial summaries, followed by one for rewriting the collection of partial summaries into a complete summary. Using a carefully chosen fine-tuning dataset, this method is shown to be effective at handling longer conversations, improving the quality of generated summaries. We conduct both an automatic evaluation (through ROUGE and two concept-based metrics focusing on medical findings) and a human evaluation (through qualitative examples from literature, assessing hallucination, generalization, fluency, and general quality of the generated summaries).
Longxiang Zhang, Renato Negrinho, Arindam Ghosh, Vasudevan Jagannathan, Hamid Reza Hassanzadeh, Thomas Schaaf, Matthew R. Gormley
0
Python
10/6/2021 Cross-lingual Intermediate Fine-tuning improves Dialogue State Tracking
Recent progress in task-oriented neural dialogue systems is largely focused on a handful of languages, as annotation of training data is tedious and expensive. Machine translation has been used to make systems multilingual, but this can introduce a pipeline of errors. Another promising solution is using cross-lingual transfer learning through pretrained multilingual models. Existing methods train multilingual models with additional code-mixed task data or refine the cross-lingual representations through parallel ontologies. In this work, we enhance the transfer learning process by intermediate fine-tuning of pretrained multilingual models, where the multilingual models are fine-tuned with different but related data and/or tasks. Specifically, we use parallel and conversational movie subtitles datasets to design cross-lingual intermediate tasks suitable for downstream dialogue tasks. We use only 200K lines of parallel data for intermediate fine-tuning which is already available for 1782 language pairs. We test our approach on the cross-lingual dialogue state tracking task for the parallel MultiWoZ (English -> Chinese, Chinese -> English) and Multilingual WoZ (English -> German, English -> Italian) datasets. We achieve impressive improvements (> 20% on joint goal accuracy) on the parallel MultiWoZ dataset and the Multilingual WoZ dataset over the vanilla baseline with only 10% of the target language task data and zero-shot setup respectively.
Nikita Moghe, Mark Steedman, Alexandra Birch
0
Python
10/6/2021 Knowledge-Aware Neural Networks for Medical Forum Question Classification
Online medical forums have become a predominant platform for answering health-related information needs of consumers. However, with a significant rise in the number of queries and the limited availability of experts, it is necessary to automatically classify medical queries based on a consumer's intention, so that these questions may be directed to the right set of medical experts. Here, we develop a novel medical knowledge-aware BERT-based model (MedBERT) that explicitly gives more weightage to medical concept-bearing words, and utilize domain-specific side information obtained from a popular medical knowledge base. We also contribute a multi-label dataset for the Medical Forum Question Classification (MFQC) task. MedBERT achieves state-of-the-art performance on two benchmark datasets and performs very well in low resource settings.
Soumyadeep Roy, Sudip Chakraborty, Aishik Mandal, Gunjan Balde, Prakhar Sharma, Anandhavelu Natarajan, Megha Khosla, Shamik Sural, Niloy Ganguly
0
Jupyter Notebook
10/6/2021 Multilingual Fact Linking
Knowledge-intensive NLP tasks can benefit from linking natural language text with facts from a Knowledge Graph (KG). Although facts themselves are language-agnostic, the fact labels (i.e., language-specific representation of the fact) in the KG are often present only in a few languages. This makes it challenging to link KG facts to sentences in languages other than the limited set of languages. To address this problem, we introduce the task of Multilingual Fact Linking (MFL) where the goal is to link fact expressed in a sentence to corresponding fact in the KG, even when the fact label in the KG is not available in the language of the sentence. To facilitate research in this area, we present a new evaluation dataset, IndicLink. This dataset contains 11,293 linked WikiData facts and 6,429 sentences spanning English and six Indian languages. We propose a Retrieval+Generation model, ReFCoG, that can scale to millions of KG facts by combining Dual Encoder based retrieval with a Seq2Seq based generation model which is constrained to output only valid KG facts. ReFCoG outperforms standard Retrieval+Re-ranking models by 10.7 pts in Precision@1. In spite of this gain, the model achieves an overall score of 52.1, showing ample scope for improvement in the task.ReFCoG code and IndicLink data are available at this https URL
Keshav Kolluru, Martin Rezk, Pat Verga, William Cohen, Partha Talukdar
0
Python
10/6/2021 Multi-Task and Multi-Corpora Training Strategies to Enhance Argumentative Sentence Linking Performance
Argumentative structure prediction aims to establish links between textual units and label the relationship between them, forming a structured representation for a given input text. The former task, linking, has been identified by earlier works as particularly challenging, as it requires finding the most appropriate structure out of a very large search space of possible link combinations. In this paper, we improve a state-of-the-art linking model by using multi-task and multi-corpora training strategies. Our auxiliary tasks help the model to learn the role of each sentence in the argumentative structure. Combining multi-corpora training with a selective sampling strategy increases the training data size while ensuring that the model still learns the desired target distribution well. Experiments on essays written by English-as-a-foreign-language learners show that both strategies significantly improve the model's performance; for instance, we observe a 15.8% increase in the F1-macro for individual link predictions.
Jan Wira Gotama Putra, Simone Teufel, Takenobu Tokunaga
0
Python
10/6/2021 Multilingual Counter Narrative Type Classification
The growing interest in employing counter narratives for hatred intervention brings with it a focus on dataset creation and automation strategies. In this scenario, learning to recognize counter narrative types from natural text is expected to be useful for applications such as hate speech countering, where operators from non-governmental organizations are supposed to answer to hate with several and diverse arguments that can be mined from online sources. This paper presents the first multilingual work on counter narrative type classification, evaluating SoTA pre-trained language models in monolingual, multilingual and cross-lingual settings. When considering a fine-grained annotation of counter narrative classes, we report strong baseline classification results for the majority of the counter narrative types, especially if we translate every language to English before cross-lingual prediction. This suggests that knowledge about counter narratives can be successfully transferred across languages.
Yi-Ling Chung, Marco Guerini, Rodrigo Agerri
0
10/6/2021 Detect and Perturb: Neutral Rewriting of Biased and Sensitive Text via Gradient-based Decoding
Written language carries explicit and implicit biases that can distract from meaningful signals. For example, letters of reference may describe male and female candidates differently, or their writing style may indirectly reveal demographic characteristics. At best, such biases distract from the meaningful content of the text; at worst they can lead to unfair outcomes. We investigate the challenge of re-generating input sentences to 'neutralize' sensitive attributes while maintaining the semantic meaning of the original text (e.g. is the candidate qualified?). We propose a gradient-based rewriting framework, Detect and Perturb to Neutralize (DEPEN), that first detects sensitive components and masks them for regeneration, then perturbs the generation model at decoding time under a neutralizing constraint that pushes the (predicted) distribution of sensitive attributes towards a uniform distribution. Our experiments in two different scenarios show that DEPEN can regenerate fluent alternatives that are neutral in the sensitive attribute while maintaining the semantics of other attributes.
Zexue He, Bodhisattwa Prasad Majumder, Julian McAuley
0
10/6/2021 Extracting and Inferring Personal Attributes from Dialogue
Personal attributes represent structured information about a person, such as their hobbies, pets, family, likes and dislikes. In this work, we introduce the tasks of extracting and inferring personal attributes from human-human dialogue. We first demonstrate the benefit of incorporating personal attributes in a social chit-chat dialogue model and task-oriented dialogue setting. Thus motivated, we propose the tasks of personal attribute extraction and inference, and then analyze the linguistic demands of these tasks. To meet these challenges, we introduce a simple and extensible model that combines an autoregressive language model utilizing constrained attribute generation with a discriminative reranker. Our model outperforms strong baselines on extracting personal attributes as well as inferring personal attributes that are not contained verbatim in utterances and instead requires commonsense reasoning and lexical inferences, which occur frequently in everyday conversation.
Zhilin Wang, Xuhui Zhou, Rik Koncel-Kedziorski, Alex Marin, Fei Xia
2
Python